Tailored for maritime combat

This article has photo gallery Published on LEUT Will Singer (author), POIS Phil Cullinan (photographer)

Location(s): Canberra, Australian Capital Territory

Lieutenant Shawn Mortimer in the new Maritime Multi-cam Pattern Uniform which is being trialled throughout the navy. (photo: POIS Phil Cullinan)
Lieutenant Shawn Mortimer in the new Maritime Multi-cam Pattern Uniform which is being trialled throughout the navy.

Navy’s ‘working rig’, the Disruptive Pattern Navy Uniform or DPNU that has been worn since 2009, is scheduled to be replaced by late 2017.

The Maritime Multi-cam Pattern Uniform will incorporate changes to the fabric, print pattern and uniform design.

With a unique six colour palette, the new style is planned to result in a balance between suitability for everyday work and protecting personnel from exposure to battle damage.

Compared to the current uniform, the new laboratory-tested fabrics have the same or better durability characteristics, are lighter in weight, and are inherently fire resistant with improved comfort.  

The cut, design and pattern of the prototype uniform based on the Australian Multicam Combat Uniform that is already being used for the land environment, and the pattern of the Air Force General Purpose uniform.  

Assistant Director of Navy Uniforms, Mrs Debra Locke, said that the prototype was manufactured based on results of a survey conducted in June 2015. 

“There are 100 sets of the new uniforms currently being worn by Navy personnel which will assess the kit to determine if it is fit-for-service,” she said.

Results and feedback will determine the final cut and design of the uniform. 

“The trial participants will assess the features that they like or dislike with the intention of using this information to develop a future maritime uniform which best meets requirements. 

“Participants from a diverse range of locations and positions have been selected and the trial will be conducted from now to 31 August,” Mrs Locke said.