Newcastle salutes Success

This article has photo gallery Published on Ms Natalie Staples (author)

Location(s): Newcastle, New South Wales

Replenishment ship HMAS Success visited the Port of Newcastle recently, the first time since August 2005. (photo: Unknown)
Replenishment ship HMAS Success visited the Port of Newcastle recently, the first time since August 2005.

Replenishment ship HMAS Success visited the Port of Newcastle recently, the first time since August 2005, to the sound of gun fire, for all the right reasons.

As Success passed Nobbys Head, a four round gun salute was fired from one of the original 6” Mk V11 guns that were installed at Fort Scratchley in 1911.  The gun was one of two that engaged the Japanese submarine I21 on 8 June 1942. 

Commanding Officer Success, Captain Justin Jones, said the ship was pleased to make it back to Newcastle, even if it was only for a weekend.

“We have been busy conducting sea qualification trials before we undergo a unit readiness workup in preparation for routine operations on the Australian station,” he said.

“The stop off in Newcastle provided the crew with some respite and also gave us the chance to provide some targeted groups like Defence Force Recruiting and the local cadets a chance to see the ship,” Captain Jones said.

Despite Success now being the oldest ship in service with the Royal Australian Navy, Captain Jones said the ship continues to "kick goals".

“We celebrated our 30th anniversary since commissioning in April.  Despite our age, Success continues to provide the Navy with a flexible, strategic combat support capability for the fleet’s warships," he said.

“The ship’s impressive operational performance over many years has paved the way for future oiler capabilities to continue providing enabling support to the Navy and Australia,” Captain Jones said.

In June 2015, Success returned from a six-month deployment as part of Operation MANITOU, the Australian Government's contribution to the international effort to promote maritime security, stability and prosperity in the Middle East region. The ship has been in a 10-month major maintenance period since then.

During the deployment, Success was flexibly tasked to conduct maritime counter terrorism and counter piracy, while supporting other task forces through underway and vertical replenishment operations and regional engagement. While deployed, Success became the first Royal Australian Navy ship assigned to a North Atlantic Treat Organisation operation and the first Australian ship integrated into a French carrier battle group.