Navy’s global engineering credibility set to soar

This article has photo gallery Published on Mr Kurravi Piggott (author), LSIS Tara Byrne (photographer), LSIS James McDougall (photographer)

Topic(s): Training, Navy Engineering, Leadership

Director General Engineering - Navy, Commodore Colin Dagg, CSC, RAN, right, explains to Lieutenant Michael Zgoznik the benefits of Navy's new partnership with one of Australia's top professional engineering associations, Engineers Australia. (photo: LSIS James McDougall)
Director General Engineering - Navy, Commodore Colin Dagg, CSC, RAN, right, explains to Lieutenant Michael Zgoznik the benefits of Navy's new partnership with one of Australia's top professional engineering associations, Engineers Australia.

Navy’s global credibility is set to thrive with the skills and knowledge of more engineering personnel to be acknowledged internationally.

In an exciting new agreement with Engineers Australia - one of the nation’s top professional engineering institutes - Royal Australian Navy Senior Technical Sailors and Engineers can now receive global accreditation.

Director General Engineering - Navy, Commodore Colin Dagg, said this accreditation would give the workforce chartered status in Leadership and Management.

“Becoming chartered should be an aspiration of everyone involved in engineering, as it is independent recognition for meeting international standards of competency,” he said.

Engineers Australia is a global industry leader, setting educational and professional benchmarks for engineers around the world.

Over the last 12 months, Engineers Australia has reviewed the qualifications and certifications within Navy engineering and found Navy’s training meets, and in some areas exceeds, international standards.

Engineers Australia Registrar Glen Crawley said this shows Navy personnel are of an extremely high calibre.

“To acknowledge this, Engineers Australia streamlined a professional assessment pathway that validates the experience and extensive training accrued by personnel,” he said.

Following the review, the Navy Professional Development Program has been included in the Defence Engineers and Senior Technicians Recognition Agreement (DESTRA).

The DESTRA was created two years ago between the Capability Acquisition and Sustainment Group and Engineers Australia, to provide accreditation to Defence Force Aviation Engineers and Senior Technicians.

Following its success, Navy worked closely with Engineers Australia to amend the contract so all categories of maritime engineering were included.

“Having more chartered members will improve our global credibility and defensibility of technical decision making, which is vital in an age of joint operations and global support arrangements,” Commodore Dagg said.

Chartered Navy personnel will be added to the National Engineering Register of Australian engineers who meet the industry’s highest professional standard.

Ranking personnel can also apply for Fellow and Engineering Executive Status, an honor reserved for true leaders of the profession.

“Our technical personnel work hard to maintain and sustain all of Navy’s platforms to ensure we can fight and win at sea, and they deserve this acknowledgement,” Commodore Dagg said.

Marine Engineer Lieutenant Michael Zgoznik hopes to become chartered within four years and believes streamlining the process through the DESTRA will enable more people to take charge of their careers.

“It gives me confidence that through the rest of my career, my skills and experiences will be recognised by an internationally accredited organisation,” he said.

The new partnership will help Navy remain at the forefront of the industry with members given access to a huge range of professional development.

“It’s about enabling a Thinking Navy, so Navy people can take advantage of various colleges, technical societies and further education through the DESTRA,” Commodore Dagg said.

“I’m excited to see not only the new agreement’s immediate benefits, but also where it leads Navy and our people in the future.”

Royal Australian Navy Chief Petty Officer Marine Technician Terry Lucas down in the engine spaces during mechanical breakdown serials onboard HMAS Stuart.

Royal Australian Navy Chief Petty Officer Marine Technician Terry Lucas down in the engine spaces during mechanical breakdown serials onboard HMAS Stuart.