Second naval officer attends Army’s Geospatial Officers’ Course

Published on LEUT Mollie Burns (author)

Location(s): Holsworthy Barracks, NSW

Topic(s): Training, Hydrography, Meteorology and Oceanography

Navy Lieutenant Andrew Taylor, second from right, with classmates of the Army’s Geospatial Officers’ Course at Holsworthy Barracks, Sydney. The course was conducted from February to April 2020. Image was taken before distancing requirements were put in place. (photo: )
Navy Lieutenant Andrew Taylor, second from right, with classmates of the Army’s Geospatial Officers’ Course at Holsworthy Barracks, Sydney. The course was conducted from February to April 2020. Image was taken before distancing requirements were put in place.

Editor’s Note: Please note that this activity took place before COVID-19 social distancing restrictions were put in place. Defence is currently following whole-of-government guidance from the Department of Health in relation to COVID-19. For more information on Defence’s response to COVID-19, visit https://news.defence.gov.au/national/defence-response-covid-19.

The second Royal Australian Navy participant of the Army’s Geospatial Officers’ Course recently graduated from the Defence Force School of Intelligence at Holsworthy Barracks in Sydney.

Lieutenant Andrew Taylor, a Maritime Geospatial Officer - Hydrography who is posted to HMAS Melville, greatly enjoyed the opportunity to expand his geospatial knowledge and work with Army counterparts.

Lieutenant Taylor, originally from Melbourne, joined the Navy in 2008 and initially served in the Submarine Force before qualifying as a H2 Hydrographic Officer.

In Melville, Lieutenant Taylor assists in survey operations and the collection, management and processing of survey data, as well as conducting duties as an Officer of the Watch.

This Army’s eight-week Geospatial Officers’ Course covers geospatial theory and products as well as capability and command, representing a rewarding and challenging professional development opportunity for a Navy officer.

Lieutenant Taylor said the course, which culminated in a four-day scenario based assessment, provided valuable insight, skills and tools which he aims to utilise within Melville.

“Course highlights included the opportunity to work with my Army geospatial colleagues and visit several civilian geospatial organisations.

“It provided a valuable insight into the role of Geospatial Officers in the wider Australian Defence Force,” he said.

He considered the course a valuable professional extension for Royal Australian Navy Hydrographic personnel, and one which he would encourage his colleagues to consider.

Rejoining Melville, Lieutenant Taylor will continue to assist in surveying operations and other taskings as the Leeuwin Class Hydrographic Ships celebrate twenty years of service in the Royal Australian Navy.