Training Continues aboard HMAS Anzac

Published on LEUT Nicholas Adriaanse (author), LSIS Paul McCallum (photographer)

Able Seaman Marine Technician Christopher Wilson at the gas turbine control panel, onboard HMAS Anzac. (photo: LSIS Paul McCallum)
Able Seaman Marine Technician Christopher Wilson at the gas turbine control panel, onboard HMAS Anzac.

HMAS Anzac sailed for Northern Trident 2015 on 15 March and made swift progress towards Anzac Cove for the ANZAC Centenary Commemorative events, over the period 22 April to 26 April.

The long transit from Fleet Base East across the Indian Ocean through the Suez Canal to the Mediterranean allowed a number of ship’s company to progress in their training continuums.

Able Seaman Marine Technician Chris Wilson recently completed his Marine Systems Technician Qualification, allowing him to hold watches on his own and undertake preventative actions on engineering plant in the case of an emergency.

“Being an Marine Systems Technician means that I am the eyes of the engineering watch.

“I use my senses in the engineering spaces to establish that nothing is wrong. However, if I do hear, smell, or see something wrong I now have the confidence in my knowledge to take initial actions and make the plant safe.

Medical Officer Lieutenant Adam Bowman shows Ship's Medical Emergency Team member Able Seaman Maritime Logistics - Chef Tae Goh, the Royal Australian Navy heat reflective shell, used for the treatment of hypothermia, as the ship transits the English Cannel.

Medical Officer Lieutenant Adam Bowman shows Ship's Medical Emergency Team member Able Seaman Maritime Logistics - Chef Tae Goh, the Royal Australian Navy heat reflective shell, used for the treatment of hypothermia, as the ship transits the English Cannel.

“The training is a long process, with plenty of practical and theoretical training but it doesn’t stop now. This is just a stepping stone in the path towards Marine Systems Manager,” Able Seaman Wilson said.

Able Seaman Musicians Blair Reardon and Tom Brooke have achieved their helm qualifications, putting them at the steering wheel of an Australian warship. 

The musicians are embarked to enhance Anzac’s capability at international engagements and commemorative events, an unusual addition to a ship’s company.

“It isn’t very often that a band detachment gets to become so much a part of the ship’s company as we have on this lengthy deployment," said Able Seaman Reardon.

“Normally the band only joins for a few weeks, or flies into location and then returns to Australia.

“This opportunity has really given me a chance to develop my naval experience which will be good for my future career as I am looking to change over to become an officer in the future,” Able Seaman Reardon said.

Able Seaman Maritime Logistics Chef Rose Arber completed her Competency Task Journal for her Chefs apprenticeship, which will now allow her to successfully be awarded her papers as a qualified chef when she meets the time requirement of four years. 

Maritime Logistics Chef Elyse Jenkins successfully completed Part 1 of her Competency Task Journal, an achievement which led to her promotion to Able Seaman.

In the Operations room, the heart of Anzac’s warfare capability training has been a constant focus with Seaman Justin Herdman and Seaman Courtney Frankl completing Part A of their Competency Evidence Journal. Able Seaman Combat Systems Operator James Moore and Seaman Combat Systems Operator Butterworth have also been successful in completing Part B of their Competency Evidence Journal.

“Completion of Part A of the Journal means the sailors transition into the Trained Force – a significant milestone in their career.

“Completion of Part B means these sailors are now progressing toward intermediate Combat System Operator training.

“Completion of these milestones increases the capability of Anzac’s Operations team,” Anzac’s Chief Petty Officer Combat Systems Manager Brad Williams said.

HMAS Anzac's Ship's Medical Emergency Team provide aid to the pilot from the embarked AS350BA Squirrel helicopter, as the ship conducts a crash on deck exercise while transiting the Mediterranean Sea, off the coast of Spain.

HMAS Anzac's Ship's Medical Emergency Team provide aid to the pilot from the embarked AS350BA Squirrel helicopter, as the ship conducts a crash on deck exercise while transiting the Mediterranean Sea, off the coast of Spain.

The officer corps hasn’t been left behind, with Lieutenant Brett Manuel and Acting Sub Lieutenant Danielle Cole achieving their Bridge Warfare Certificate Endorsement for Anzac Class frigates, allowing them to hold unsupervised watches on the bridge, while Officer of the Watch Jye O’Dell was promoted to Lieutenant.

Lieutenants Sally McCall and Des Paroz completed their Helicopter Control Officer course prior to Anzac leaving the Australian station, and became endorsed as Grade 2 Helicopter Control Officers on the ship during the transit. 

Anzac’s Ship’s Warrant Officer, Warrant Officer Samantha Morgan has the responsibility for being Anzac’s training officer.

“Although we are a ship at sea halfway across the world our training continues on a daily basis, building capacity for Anzac and preparing people for their future careers,” Warrant Officer Morgan said.

HMAS Anzac is currently deployed on NORTHERN TRIDENT 2015 during which it will participate in the Centenary of Anzac commemorations in April, followed by a series of important international engagements.