Navy Engineers of the future relish world class training and education

This article has photo gallery Published on MIDN Jack Meadows (author), LSIS James McDougall (photographer)

Location(s): Australian Defence Force Academy, ACT

Topic(s): Open Day, Science, Technology & Innovation, Australian Defence Force Academy

Weapons Electrical Engineer in-training Midshipman Rebecca Gonchee tests electrical resistance using a multimeter on her self-built breadboard at the Australian Defence Force Academy, Canberra. (photo: LSIS James McDougall)
Weapons Electrical Engineer in-training Midshipman Rebecca Gonchee tests electrical resistance using a multimeter on her self-built breadboard at the Australian Defence Force Academy, Canberra.

University of New South Wales (UNSW) Australian Defence Force Academy’s (ADFA) first virtual Open Day is now underway until Saturday 22 August 2020.

Midshipman Rebecca Gonchee is studying a Bachelor of Engineering at ADFA, training as a Navy Weapons Electrical Engineer.

“I am excited to utilise my training in a cohesive and welcoming environment, in particular as an engineer, working with advanced technologies within the Navy.

“My main motivation towards becoming an engineer in the Navy is the ability to combine technical and mathematical skills with the aspects of comradery, leadership, and adventure.

“Throughout school I enjoyed STEM related subjects and I was fortunate to participate in specific engineering challenges which fostered my passion for problem solving, teamwork and innovative thinking,” she said.

Weapons Electrical Engineer in-training Midshipman Rebecca Gonchee holds up a breadboard she’s been working on for circuitry learning at the Australian Defence Force Academy, Canberra.

Weapons Electrical Engineer in-training Midshipman Rebecca Gonchee holds up a breadboard she’s been working on for circuitry learning at the Australian Defence Force Academy, Canberra.

Midshipman Gonchee expects her combined military education and academic study of an Engineering undergraduate degree, will prepare her well to enter the fleet.

Students studying STEM related courses at ADFA are privileged to have cutting-edge technology and state-of-the-art labs and equipment at their fingertips to hone their skills.

“ADFA has excellent learning facilities. The lecture theatres are used for both military and academic classes.

“In 2020, a seamless transition to online learning ensured learning outcomes were still achieved.

“The engineering labs and workshops specialised to different streams of engineering, providing students with a hands-on application for the content learnt in classes,” she said.

A big part of ADFA’s focus for students is helping them to develop into well-rounded and capable military leaders.

STEM courses at ADFA are unique in providing students the opportunity to apply their knowledge in a military environment.

Several opportunities are afforded to students to further their experiences through deployments and exceptional field involvement.

“At ADFA we receive leadership training through the Joint Military Education Training program.

“We receive general education on areas such as organisational management, the history of warfare, human development, and military law.

“The training consists of workshops, academic lectures, and leadership challenges, with assessments for each element. All Officer Trainees at ADFA complete one Leadership Challenge per year,” Midshipman Gonchee said.

ADFA Navy graduates are integrated into the fleet as educated, professional and well-equipped leaders.

Navy hopes to attract STEM enthusiasts as prospective Engineering Officers and future Navy leaders.

ADFA’s virtual Open Day will take place on ADFA’s Facebook page and Instagram (@adfacademy) account.