Seaworthiness strategy launched

This article has photo gallery Published on Department of Defence (author), ABIS Richard Cordell (photographer)

Location(s): Sydney, New South Wales

Commander Australian Fleet, Rear Admiral Stuart Mayer, CSC and Bar, RAN launched the Fleet Seaworthiness Strategy at Fleet Headquarters, Sydney. (photo: ABIS Richard Cordell)
Commander Australian Fleet, Rear Admiral Stuart Mayer, CSC and Bar, RAN launched the Fleet Seaworthiness Strategy at Fleet Headquarters, Sydney.

Navy's path to a mature Seaworthiness system was launched by Commander Australian Fleet, Rear Admiral Stuart Mayer, during the HMAS Success & Sirius Seaworthiness Board on 29 July.

 “The Fleet Seaworthiness Strategy provides assurance that Navy's required capability is being delivered in a safe and effective way, it describes how the Seaworthiness system will operate across the Fleet,” Rear Admiral Mayer said.

“The key to effective implementation of Seaworthiness is the involvement of all members of the Navy, and those that support Navy, in achieving our mission.”

The Fleet Seaworthiness Strategy covers the period up until 2018, and is closely aligned with the Navy Strategy, Plan Pelorus.

“We think around 2018 is when we will see a mature approach to seaworthiness that is generated from within our workforce.  

"Embedding practices and creating behaviours and the right culture takes time, but we are making progress.

“At the moment our system is a combination of reactive and in-part proactive elements.  

"Our goal is to get towards a largely pro-active system.  

"We will measure our progress at both the Fleet and strategic level,” Rear Admiral Mayer said.

A key hallmark of the Fleet Seaworthiness Strategy is creating justified confidence in the Seaworthiness system.  This is done through evidence-based assurance, taking into account all relevant hazards and work health and safety risks in Navy's operating environment.

“The strategy has been built by us, for us," he said.

"It will give all personnel justified confidence in our ability to fight and win at sea.  

"It also provide us with clear standards and repeatable ways of demonstrating ongoing performance, so we can make better, informed decisions, within a more collaborative culture,” Rear Admiral Mayer said.

The Fleet Seaworthiness Strategy builds on a number of initiatives already implemented, including the Sea Release Assurance Framework, improvements to risk and safety systems and remediation of some assessment activities.