Waterhen supports Indigenous program

Published on LCDR Alan Parton (author)

Location(s): Sydney, New South Wales

Topic(s): Defence Indigenous Development Program (DIDP), HMAS Waterhen, HMAS Gascoyne (M85), Australian Clearance Diving Team ONE

Students from the Defence Indigenous Development Program and Chief Petty Officer Trevor Maybir pose for a picture with HMAS Gascoyne Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Commander Alan Parton, RAN outside the ship, following a tour. (photo: Unknown)
Students from the Defence Indigenous Development Program and Chief Petty Officer Trevor Maybir pose for a picture with HMAS Gascoyne Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Commander Alan Parton, RAN outside the ship, following a tour.

Recruits from the Defence Indigenous Development Program got a chance to take a closer look at what life is like onboard a Royal Australian Navy minehunter, when sixteen participants visited Sydney recently.

The visitors spent the day at establishment, HMAS Waterhen, visiting Australia Mine Warfare Team 16 and Australian Clearance Diving Team One, before embarking HMAS Gascoyne.

Recruit Jeremiah Maitie Manning said he was impressed by how much could be packed into a small space.

“The tour was pretty inspiring ; it motivated me even more to join the Navy as a Marine Technical sailor,” he said.

“The best thing about the visit was meeting the ship’s company and witnessing first hand how they live and work on such a small ship,” Recruit Manning said.

Members of Gascoyne’s ship’s company explained the important role Huon class coastal minehunters play in protecting the nation’s waterways from the threat of sea mines.  

Recruit Shakira Thaiday, said she learnt a great deal from the visit.

“During the tour, I learned that mine hunters look for the old mines that may be still active and floating in the oceans.

“While Gascoyne was very interesting, I would prefer to work on bigger ships as there is more room,” Recruit Thaiday said.

Chief Petty Officer Trevor Maybir, a Senior Divisional Instructor who travelled with the students said by getting to see Navy life first hand, the students could decide Navy could be a suitable a career for them.

“This is a great way for the recruits to get an insight into possible careers,” Chief Petty Officer Maybir said.

“The group really enjoyed their visit.  They have now returned to Cairns and will start their TAFE Year 10 Education and then graduate at the end of the ‘living-in’ program.”

Defence Indigenous Development Programme recruits come from all over Australia.  They join the Navy on a six month enlistment term. 

“Before they graduate, the recruits have the option of extending their enlistment allowing them to join the next Recruit School Division,” Chief Petty Officer Maybir said.

Information on taking part in the Defence Indigenous Development Program is available here: http://www.defence.gov.au/Diversity/indigenous/career/ADF/didp.asp