Navy engineers and technical sailors to become masters of their own careers

Published on Ms Kerrie Moore (author), Department of Defence (photographer)

Topic(s): Naval Engineering

Information sessions being conducted around Australia are informing military members of their obligations and how the Naval Engineering Career Continuum will benefit them in their future careers. (photo: Department of Defence)
Information sessions being conducted around Australia are informing military members of their obligations and how the Naval Engineering Career Continuum will benefit them in their future careers.

More exciting change is coming for the Royal Australian Navy’s uniform engineering personnel. The Naval Engineering Career Continuum (NECC) which goes live on 29 October 2018, is set to completely redefine how our military members view, and ultimately, direct their own careers.

Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Mike Noonan, recently said that Navy’s people and culture is at the top of his priority list and that “without the right people, supported by an inclusive and accountable culture, we will not be able to achieve Navy’s mission.”

The NECC is one mechanism that Naval Engineering is employing to accomplish this objective.

The NECC is designed to allow the Navy to deliver self-sustaining Areas of Employment (engineering officers) and Career Pathways (technical sailors) for the Navy engineering community, while taking into consideration individual developmental goals and career aspirations, as well as Navy’s requirements.

NECC personnel are currently carrying out information sessions around Australia informing military members of their obligations and how this will benefit them in their future careers. These sessions began in August and so far have been delivered in five locations across the country to more than 1300 engineering officers and technical sailors.

NECC manager, CMDR Des O’Neil says “feedback received from the engineering officers is they wish they had the Areas of Employment earlier in their journey to assist them.”

NECC will use Engineer Mastery Assessment (EMA) for its engineering officers and Technical Mastery Individual Assessment (TMIA) for each of its technical sailors in order to measure Engineering and Technical Mastery. This will then allow platform managers onboard ships to view the current skill capability of their crew, and identify any skill gaps early on.

Petty Officer Craig Dudley, who recently attended one of the information sessions, said that he could also “use the TMIA as a heat map, allowing departments to see where each rank and trade sit in terms of Technical Mastery (TM), giving us an indication of technical skill levels which Navy hasn’t been able to quantify before.”

From October 29, all engineering officers and technical sailors will have a month to complete an initial TMIA or EMA so that a baseline of Engineer and Technical Mastery for the Navy engineering workforce is established.

For more information you can review the NECC website on the DRN, or contact the NECC team at NECCcorro@drn.mil.au.