HMAS Penguin dives in to help sick kids' charity

This article has photo gallery Published on Department of Defence (author)

Location(s): HMAS Penguin, Sydney

Topic(s): HMAS Penguin, Humpty Dumpty Foundation

Clearance Divers at the RAN Diving School demonstrate the capability of different in-service scuba sets during a tour for guests of the Humpty Dumpty Foundation, at HMAS Penguin, Sydney. (photo: ABIS Bonny Gassner)
Clearance Divers at the RAN Diving School demonstrate the capability of different in-service scuba sets during a tour for guests of the Humpty Dumpty Foundation, at HMAS Penguin, Sydney.

As the Royal Australian Navy’s primary medical training facility, it was fitting that HMAS Penguin continued their support of sick children by hosting a tour of the Sydney base for charity recently.

Members of the local community purchased tickets for the tour at an auction to support children's charity, the Humpty Dumpty Foundation.

Commanding Officer Commander Ian Campbell said the base was pleased to continue its support of the charity.

Penguin has been supporting the Foundation and its vital work for over five years. Each year we offer tours to help raise money and have a team that takes part in the annual Balmoral Burn fun run,” Commander Campbell said.

“The Humpty Dumpty Foundation buys essential and often life-saving medical equipment to help sick kids in more than 250 hospitals around the country."

“As part of the Navy family, we are proud to provide ongoing support to such a worthwhile cause.”

Penguin is also home to the Australian Defence Force Diving School, where the Royal Australian Navy’s clearance divers learn their expert skills.

During the tour, one of the ticket holders was allowed to put on the bomb protection suit worn by divers during bomb disposal activities.

The school also showed off their students' skills with clearance divers providing an in-water demonstration of different scuba sets and diving helmets.

Personnel from the Submarine and Underwater Medicine Facility also showcased some of their specialist equipment, including the four-man hyperbaric chamber.

Another highlight was a demonstration at the Royal Australian Navy’s Medical School simulation facility.

Students used the school’s fully automated and lifelike mannequins as patients for a display of their medical skills in the state-of-the-art facility.

The Humpty Dumpty Foundation raises money to fund specialist medical equipment for paediatric wards, neonatal units, maternity and emergency departments in hospitals around Australia.