A busy man gives something back

Published on LEUT Adam Grover (author), ABIS Tom Gibson (photographer)

Location(s): Hobart, TAS

Topic(s): Exercise DUGONG, Australian Naval Reserve Diving Team TEN

Royal Australian Navy reservist diver from Diving Team 10, Able Seaman Luke Shea, during Exercise DUGONG 15. (photo: ABIS Tom Gibson)
Royal Australian Navy reservist diver from Diving Team 10, Able Seaman Luke Shea, during Exercise DUGONG 15.

It’s said if you want a job done, give it to a busy person, this phrase certainly applies to Able Seaman Clearance Diver Luke Shea. A member of Australian Naval Reserve Dive Team Ten, based in the beautiful port city of Hobart, Able Seaman Shea is a family man, the General Manager of Tasmania’s largest automotive group, JMC Automotive, as well as finding time to serve his country as a diver.

“Growing up in Hobart I attended Sacred Heart College and it was at school that I started to learn about the contribution to our national security which the Navy has always provided,” Able Seaman Shea said.

“However it wasn’t until I spoke with both my maternal and paternal great uncles, both of whom served with Navy that I really understood just how important Navy is.

"From that point it was really only a matter of time before I joined too," he said.

United States Navy Diver, Petty Officer First Class Nicholas Blankshine (left), explains to Royal Australian Navy reservist divers, Able Seamen Daniel Morgan and Luke Shea(centre), how his team's oxygen system works, on the wharf at Hobart, Tasmania, during Exercise DUGONG 15.

United States Navy Diver, Petty Officer First Class Nicholas Blankshine (left), explains to Royal Australian Navy reservist divers, Able Seamen Daniel Morgan and Luke Shea(centre), how his team's oxygen system works, on the wharf at Hobart, Tasmania, during Exercise DUGONG 15.


Able Seaman Shea was speaking as an active participant in Exercise DUGONG 15. This exercise, based in the waters off Hobart, is a multinational exercise involving clearance and salvage divers from Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, the United States, New Zealand and observers from India and Sweden.  The two-week exercise will develop skills and interoperability in mine lay and recovery operations, unmanned underwater vehicle operations, mine hunting, mine countermeasures operations and salvage diving.

"Being a team member on such a significant exercise is fantastic," Able Seaman Shea said.

"The professional skills I have developed as a member of the dive team have been really extended and deepened by working closely with our international partners.

"I am really fortunate to work with great friends and the diversity of the team brings much to achieving our collective goals, in the same way the partnerships built up during Exercise DUGONG 15 allows all of our nations to collectively keep sea lanes free of mines and to facilitate freedom of movement through maritime trading routes.

"Importantly, for me, I feel am able to give back to my wife, Julia and two-year old son Noah, who allow me to undertake this important work."

Royal Australian Navy reservist diver from Diving Team 10, Able Seaman Luke Shea, during Exercise DUGONG 15.

Royal Australian Navy reservist diver from Diving Team 10, Able Seaman Luke Shea, during Exercise DUGONG 15.


Exercise DUGONG 15 continues through until 16 October.

Imagery is available on the Navy Image Library at http://images.navy.gov.au/S20152807.