The cold water specialist at home during Exercise DUGONG

Published on LEUT Adam Grover (author), ABIS Tom Gibson (photographer)

Location(s): Hobart, TAS

Topic(s): Exercise DUGONG, Australian Naval Reserve Diving Team TEN

Royal Australian Navy reservist diver from Diving Team 10, Leading Seaman Nicholas Dingle, inside his team's storage room during Exercise DUGONG 15. (photo: ABIS Tom Gibson)
Royal Australian Navy reservist diver from Diving Team 10, Leading Seaman Nicholas Dingle, inside his team's storage room during Exercise DUGONG 15.

Quiet, with a glint in his eye, Leading Seaman Clearance Diver Nick Dingle, is a man who inspires confidence and respect. Currently involved in Exercise DUGONG 15, as an active member of Naval Reserve Diving Team 10, Leading Seaman Dingle has established himself as a qualified and highly competent member of a very tight team.

As a former permanent member of the Navy, of ten years standing, and as a current serving Police Officer with Tasmania Police, Leading Seaman Dingle has an almost instinctive commitment to service.  

"I have always enjoyed diving, and the chance to dive in some of the most remarkable underwater environments off the Tasmanian coast, while continuing to serve, was too good to pass up, hence my reason to join the Naval Reserve," he said.

"Diving is an inherently risky pursuit, what makes Navy diving different is the absolute commitment to safety and the very comprehensive and high-standard training that is in the DNA of what Navy does and stands for.

"The variety of opportunities within Navy diving means that you’re always challenged and meeting those challenges with your mates is incredibly rewarding," he said.

Held in Hobart for the second time, the exercise brings together divers, mine warfare experts and observers from Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, New Zealand, India and Sweden to collaboratively work together to conduct mine countermeasures training as well as fostering improved understanding and interoperability.

"We are involved in clearance diving, mine countermeasures, salvage and underwater construction work," Leading Seaman Dingle said.

"Each of these have their own challenges and can only really be achieved as a result of the close relationships and support within the team.

"As a reserve unit we are capable of independent work and, yet, can and do integrate with divers from the permanent forces as required."

When he’s not serving with Tasmania Police or diving with the Navy, he still enjoys recreational diving in the cool clear waters off the Tasman Peninsula in Southern Tasmania.

"It’s a remarkable place to dive and I’m lucky to live in a special place like Tasmania."