Indonesian cadets get 'Aussie' experience

This article has photo gallery Published on Department of Defence (author), ABIS Sarah Williams (photographer)

Location(s): Nowra, NSW

Topic(s): HMAS Albatross, HMAS Creswell

(3rd left) Mr Ray Burt, a volunteer at the Albatross Fleet Air Arm Museum, provides a tour to five visiting Indonesian Navy officer cadets, here on an exchange program. (photo: ABIS Sarah Williams)
(3rd left) Mr Ray Burt, a volunteer at the Albatross Fleet Air Arm Museum, provides a tour to five visiting Indonesian Navy officer cadets, here on an exchange program.

The group of five fourth year Navy cadets from the Akademi Angkatan Laut, spent a fortnight visiting training establishments including Navy's HMAS Albatross and HMAS Creswell, in the New South Wales Shoalhaven region.

Their Escort Officer, Commander James Crouch, a Royal Australian Navy Instructor at the Indonesian Staff College, said watching a four-foot snake being removed from the Creswell wardroom was a highlight.

“It was only a python but it came on their second day at the base,’ Commander Crouch said.

New Entry Officer Cadets 53 and staff, with six members of the Tentara Nasional Indonesia-Angkatan Laut (Indonesian Navy) at HMAS Creswell as part of an exchange program.

New Entry Officer Cadets 53 and staff, with six members of the Tentara Nasional Indonesia-Angkatan Laut (Indonesian Navy) at HMAS Creswell as part of an exchange program.

“The kangaroos were also a big drawcard for the visitors who never seemed to tire of them. "Many photos and 'roo selfies' were taken.”

The visitors were warmly received by Creswell's New Entry Officers' Course students who included the Indonesians in their normal activities.

“It was interesting to note the variations in systems at the two training institutions,” Commander Crouch said. “Indonesian cadets sleep four to a room with senior cadets sharing and mentoring junior cadets 24/7.”

The cadets also exchanged tips for survival training. The New Entry Officers' Course students were relieved they do not have to hunt, kill and eat monkeys as part of their survival training, as the Indonesian cadets destined to become marines are required to do.