INS Sahyadri IFR visit

Published on SGT Dave Morley (author), LSIS Helen Frank (author)

Location(s): Sydney, NSW

Topic(s): International Fleet Review

Indian sailors on INS Sahyadri Petty Officer Uttam Kushwaha, Lieutenant Pramendra Yadav and Leading Seaman Sunil Rana in Sydney for the International Fleet Review. (photo: LSIS Helen Frank)
Indian sailors on INS Sahyadri Petty Officer Uttam Kushwaha, Lieutenant Pramendra Yadav and Leading Seaman Sunil Rana in Sydney for the International Fleet Review.

"Visiting Sydney is one of my dreams come true,” said PO Uttam Kushwaha, a gun maintainer in INS Sahyadri, the Indian Navy’s newest ship.

“It is one of the most beautiful cities I have ever visited,” he said.

“I really enjoyed the way we were welcomed here.”

PO Kushwaha said he and his men were responsible for illuminating the ship just before its arrival in Sydney.

“Before coming to IFR we made sure that we did not miss anything required to make the review a memorable one,” he said.

“We gathered lighting sources, all required spares and rations.

“We travelled about 7000 miles without any problem, which shows the standard of our preparation.”

LEUT Pramendra Yadav, Surface to Air Missile Control Officer, said it was a good experience working with the RAN.

“The interoperability between both the Navies was good,” he said.

“In fact, the work culture seemed to be quite similar.

“Various exercises conducted at Jervis Bay and enroute from Jervis Bay to Sydney proved it.”

LEUT Yadav said it was a great experience to see and be involved in such a big event.

“All officers, as well as the men, are very excited and enthusiastic about being a part of it,” he said.

“The warm welcome and hospitality shown by the people of Australia made us feel special.”

LSRCI Sunil Rana, Barak Operator, said there were many things he learnt on the long voyage to Sydney.

“Things like working on the rough seas, to be on my toes while on a long deployment and interaction with other Navies,” he said.

“The interaction with some of the officers of the Australian Navy was enjoyable.

“Then the boarding exercise with the Chinese ship was a learning experience for us.”

INS Sahyadri, a 6361 tonne multipurpose command and control platform, was commissioned on July 21, 2012.

Her name comes from the mountain range that protected the west coast of India from sea invasions going back 1800 years.