Australian-Indian ties draws closer

This article has photo gallery Published on LCDR Fiona Eggins (author), LSIS Tom Gibson (author)

Topic(s): Training, Operations, Operation MANITOU, Sport, HMAS Warramunga (F152)

Commanding Officer HMAS Warramunga Commander Dugald Clelland (right) is presented a plaque by Flag Officer Commanding Goa Naval Area and Naval Aviation Rear Admiral Puneet K Bahl, VSM during the ship's visit to Goa, India, as part of HMAS Warramunga's deployment to Operation Manitou.  (photo: LSIS Tom Gibson)
Commanding Officer HMAS Warramunga Commander Dugald Clelland (right) is presented a plaque by Flag Officer Commanding Goa Naval Area and Naval Aviation Rear Admiral Puneet K Bahl, VSM during the ship's visit to Goa, India, as part of HMAS Warramunga's deployment to Operation Manitou.
The Navy to Navy relationship between Australia and India was deepened recently with HMAS Warramunga conducting exercises with INS Subhadra.

The Australian ship was in Goa on her way to deploying to the Middle East as a part of Operation MANITOU.
 
The passage exercise with the Sukanya class offshore patrol vessel was a good opportunity for the bridge team of the frigate to put recent training into practice.
 
Navigating Officer, Lieutenant Gregory Wickens said the officers-of-the-watch relished the in-company time.
 
“It was a good experience for the bridge team of Warramunga as three of the four officers-of-the-watch have not had previous experience with a foreign Navy warship,” Lieutenant Wickens said.
 
“The exercise gave a good indication of what they can expect over the course of the deployment.”
 
The ships independently sailed from the Port of Vasco Da Gama on the morning of 12 November, to rendezvous off the coast of Goa.
 
Officer-of-the-watch manoeuvres, which involves ship handling in close proximity to each other, was the first activity to occur and was followed by a mail transfer via an Indian Chetak helicopter.
 
The exercise ended with a replenishment approaches, passing a distance line between the two ships.
 
On completion of the exercise, both ships’ companies lined upper decks and cheered ship prior to departing the area.
 
This type of exercise enables increased interoperability between like-minded nations both focussed on maritime security of the Indian Ocean.