Navy welcomes Indian circumnavigators

This article has photo gallery Published on LEUT Will Singer (author), CPOIS Damian Pawlenko (photographer)

Location(s): Fremantle, WA

The Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral (VADM) Timothy Barrett, AO, CSC, RAN, stands with the six crew members of the Indian Sail Training Ship Tarini berthed at the Fremantle Yacht Club during his visit to the vessel in Fremantle, Western Australia. (photo: CPOIS Damian Pawlenko)
The Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral (VADM) Timothy Barrett, AO, CSC, RAN, stands with the six crew members of the Indian Sail Training Ship Tarini berthed at the Fremantle Yacht Club during his visit to the vessel in Fremantle, Western Australia.

Indian Navy sailing boat INSV Tarini stopped in Fremantle recently, further developing the friendship with the Royal Australian Navy before sailing ‘across the ditch’ as part of a historic journey to circumnavigate the world. 

The Indian Navy returned to the port having joined the Australian-hosted joint training exercise ‘AUSINDEX’ in June that developed a deeper relationship between the two navies.

The all-women crew of Tarini set sail from Goa in September - a journey that will see the cruising sloop sailing through the Indian, Pacific and Atlantic Oceans.

Australian Chief of Navy Vice Admiral Tim Barrett welcomed Tarini's crew to Australia and handed a letter of ‘warm regards’ from Defence Minister Marise Payne to skipper Lieutenant Commander Vartika Joshi.

“The crew of INSV Tarini are an inspiration to all of us and I wish you safe travels during this challenging voyage,” Vice Admiral Barrett said.

“I wish you fair winds and following seas.”

Lieutenant Commander Joshi said that the crew received a heart-warming welcome from Western Australians upon their arrival.

“It is the first time in India's history that an all-woman crew is attempting to circumnavigate the globe, sailing through unexplored parts of the planet while monitoring sea water temperatures on the high seas,” Lieutenant Commander Joshi said.

“It’s been a great journey despite encountering some rough seas between India and to Australia.

“Our respite in Fremantle allowed us some time-off to explore Rottnest Island and enjoy roaming the city sites.

“We have prepared the boat for our next challenging leg of the trip to Lyttleton, New Zealand,” she said.

Tarini and her six crew consist of air traffic controllers, architects and legal officers who have sailed approximately 20,000 nautical miles as part of their training.

During their circumnavigation journey the crew will make three other stopovers – in Lyttleton, Port Stanley, in the Falklands, and Cape Town, in South Africa.