HMAS Farncomb visits the Apple Isle

This article has photo gallery Published on Ms Natalie Staples (author), Unknown (author)

Location(s): Hobart, Tasmania

Topic(s): HMAS Farncomb (S74)

Lieutenant Kristy-Ann Youd and her family and friends pose for a picture after the Electronics
Warfare Officer took them on a personal tour of submarine HMAS Farncomb during a port visit
to Tasmania. (photo: Unknown)
Lieutenant Kristy-Ann Youd and her family and friends pose for a picture after the Electronics Warfare Officer took them on a personal tour of submarine HMAS Farncomb during a port visit to Tasmania.

Family and friends had a chance to explore life onboard a submarine when Farncomb stopped off for a five day port visit during a recent south-east Australia deployment.

The visit was the first time many of the ship’s company had a chance to show loved ones what their day job entails.

Electronic Warfare Officer, Lieutenant Kristy-Ann Youd, who hails from Caveside, Tasmania, invited her mother, aunt and former teacher, and family, onboard for a personal tour of the Collins Class submarine. 

Teacher, Maggie Howe whose grandkids accompanied her on the tour said it was a wonderful experience.

“How fortunate we are to get such a detailed and personal tour of Farncomb. It is fascinating and provides a great insight into the life of a submariner,” she said.

“My grandkids Caleb, Jarrod and Ruby and I felt extremely privileged to have been given access. The children were rapt and so excited and couldn’t wait to share their experiences with their school friends the next day. They will remember it forever,” Ms Howe said.

It was also a chance for personnel to show the pride they have in their boat.

“Serving on Farncomb is terrific. I work with some great people and we do important work. Being able to share some of what we do with the people we love is quite special,” Lieutenant Youd said.

Aside from providing tours to special groups while in port, the ship’s company also had a chance for some respite.

Collins class submarines are an important strategic asset for Australia’s maritime defence and national security.

They meet Australia’s unique strategic circumstances through stealth, long-range endurance, formidable striking power and advanced intelligence collection capabilities.