Dolphins a family affair

This article has photo gallery Published on LSIS Lee-Anne Mack (author and photographer)

Location(s): HMAS Stirling

Topic(s): Submarine Force, Training Authority - Submarines

Seaman Acoustic Warfare Analyst Benjamin Webb's father Mr Warren Webb presents his son with his new name badge featuring dolphins at a submarine qualification ceremony held at Submarine Training and Systems Centre, HMAS Stirling. (photo: LSIS Lee-Anne Mack)
Seaman Acoustic Warfare Analyst Benjamin Webb's father Mr Warren Webb presents his son with his new name badge featuring dolphins at a submarine qualification ceremony held at Submarine Training and Systems Centre, HMAS Stirling.

Twelve new sailors joined the Submarine service at a ceremony in Western Australia on 13 November.
 
It was a very special day for Seaman Acoustic Warfare Analyst Benjamin Webb, who was presented his 'dolphins' by his father, Mr Warren Webb.
 
Mr Webb an ex-Petty Officer Marine Technician Submariner works as a contractor at Training Authority Submarines, Fleet Base West, as a Submarine Platform Instructor.

“Seeing Ben qualify as a submariner results in feelings of total joy and pride," Mr Webb said.

"To see him come this far in such a short time, and achieve what he has, only makes me prouder both as a dad, and as a fellow submariner. 

“I was happy just being able to attend the ceremony, but ecstatic to be given the opportunity to present him his dolphins.

"Being the one to place the first set of dolphins onto his chest and welcome him into the family of submariners truly means a lot to me,” he said.
 

Graduates of the submarine qualification course at  Submarine Training and Systems Centre, HMAS Stirling.

Graduates of the submarine qualification course at Submarine Training and Systems Centre, HMAS Stirling.


The Webb family dinner table is abuzz with talk of Navy, with both Seaman Webb and his older sister currently serving in the Royal Australian Navy.
 
“Mum is less enthusiastic about Submarines, because we all go home and talk Submarines and she works for the Western Australian Police, so she just sits there having no idea of what we are talking about,” Seaman Webb joked.
 
Joining the Navy two weeks after completing high school in November 2014, Seaman Webb spent the last 12 months in training and feels ready for life in the fleet.
 
“Going to sea for the first time, I loved it, and I think that can be attributed to the quality of training, support and encouragement throughout my training,” Seaman Webb said.
 
Petty Officer Electronic Warfare Submariner Timothy McLaughlin, Submarine Qualification Team Leader, coordinates the training.
 
“The submarine qualification process is largely self-driven, and it is about having the right attitude," he said.

"It is not all classroom learning, the trainees are given their goals and tasks to achieve, and are supported throughout their journey but in the end they are responsible for getting themselves there,” Petty Officer McLaughlin said.
 
“We find that with knowledge comes confidence, the trainees need to have a thorough understanding of what they are about to embark on as a career and appreciation they will have other people’s lives in their hands.
 
“The training is to make sure they are safe, are able to serve at sea, know their job and have an understanding and the fundamental knowledge to bring the submarine to emergency stations in the event of an incident.
 
“This is the largest group of graduates we have had at once,” Petty Officer McLaughlin said.
 
Since July, 43 new trainees have graduated to join the submarine fleet.