Leaving behind a historical legacy

Published on Ms Eliza Bavin (author), LSIS Jo Dilorenzo (photographer)

Topic(s): Fleet Air Arm Museum, RAN Heritage Centre, Museum of HMAS Cerberus, HMAS Creswell Museum

Commander Shane Moore on Sydney Harbour for Australia Day, 2008. (photo: Unknown)
Commander Shane Moore on Sydney Harbour for Australia Day, 2008.

After 31 years serving the people of Australia in the Royal Australian Navy, Commander Shane Moore will retire in December. An intelligence specialist by trade, Commander Moore's passion for history and his reinvigoration of Navy heritage is his legacy in Navy.

Commander Shane Moore was awarded the Conspicuous Service Medal at Government House, Sydney in 2008.

Commander Shane Moore was awarded the Conspicuous Service Medal at Government House, Sydney in 2008.

After joining the Navy as a Direct Entry Instructor Lieutenant in 1982, Commander Moore went one to become a lecturer in Naval History and Warfare at HMAS Creswell in 1987.

“In 2002, the Navy reviewed its management of cultural heritage and decided to establish a Director of the Naval Heritage Collection. As I have qualifications in marine archeology, and postgraduate degrees from Macquarie and Sydney Universities in classics, history, archaeology and conservation as well as a Diploma of Research Archaeology from the British School in Athens, I was selected as the first Director.”

In this role Commander Moore was instrumental in the construction and exhibition design of the RAN Heritage Centre in 2005, the re-acquisition and reinvigoration of Fleet Air Arm Museum at HMAS Albatross in 2007 and the upgrading of the Museum of HMAS Cerberus in more recent years.

Both the RAN Heritage Centre and the Fleet Air Arm Museum have gone on to win awards for the exhibitions designed by Commander Moore. This contribution was recognised in 2006, when he was awarded a Conspicuous Service Medal in the Queens Birthday honour list for services to Navy heritage.

“Perhaps my proudest achievement is not the physical Museums themselves but playing a part in seeing the heritage of Navy being brought “out of the cupboard” and exhibited to the Australian people on a scale not even dreamed of before. This could only have been achieved through the wonderful ongoing support of the four Chiefs of Navy, three Systems Commanders and two Fleet Commanders I worked for when I was the Director,” said Commander Moore.

After ten years as Director of the Naval Heritage Collection, Commander Moore was posted to his current position Deputy Commander Shore Force in Fleet Headquarters at HMAS Kuttabul.

While he is sad to be saying farewell to the Navy, Commander Moore has an exciting future ahead of him.

“My wife and I will be moving to rural France, where I plan to volunteer as a curator/archaeologist at the French National Museum of Pre-History in Les Eyzies-de-tayac,” said Commander Moore.