International partner visits Dahlgren training center

Published on Ms Kimberly M Lansdale (author), ATRC Mr Daryl Roy (photographer)

Location(s): Dahlgren, Virginia, USA

Aegis Training and Readiness Center's Commanding Officer Captain Ian Hall (middle) and LEUT Colin Holloway (right) discuss how ATRC uses instructor-led classrooms, simulation and hands-on training labs to train sailors during Royal Australian Navy's Commodore Michael Noonan's (left) visit to the schoolhouse. (photo: Daryl Roy, ATRC, US Navy)
Aegis Training and Readiness Center's Commanding Officer Captain Ian Hall (middle) and LEUT Colin Holloway (right) discuss how ATRC uses instructor-led classrooms, simulation and hands-on training labs to train sailors during Royal Australian Navy's Commodore Michael Noonan's (left) visit to the schoolhouse.

The Royal Australian Navy's Commodore of Training visited the Center for Surface Combat Systems (CSCS) and Aegis Training and Readiness Center (ATRC), co-located onboard Naval Support Facility Dahlgren, Virginia, on 8 November.

CDRE Michael Noonan visited CSCS and ATRC to see firsthand how the US Navy trains its Sailors and give him a better understanding of how RAN sailors manning the new Hobart class of air warfare destroyers (AWD) will be trained at ATRC.

CSCS Commanding Officer Captain Don Schmieley hosted Noonan during working lunch discussions.

“We have a great relationship with RAN and several of their sailors will begin their training with us after the New Year,” Schmieley said.

“We discussed United States Navy Instructor qualifications, curriculum standards, schoolhouse accreditation, crew certifications, and Personal Qualification Standards (PQS). This discussion provided CDRE Noonan with a greater understanding of the training his sailors will receive.”

ATRC Commanding Officer Capt. Ian Hall hosted Noonan during the tour of the schoolhouse.

“CDRE Noonan observed a blended learning solution that includes standard classrooms, hands-on labs, simulations, as well as computer-based and interactive courseware training,” Hall explained.

“We are looking forward to having Australia in the schoolhouse as they bring their new Aegis ships online.”

Noonan, who was appointed his current role in September 2012, was enthralled with his discussions with CSCS and ATRC and the quality of training he observed.

“I thank CSCS and ATRC for their continued support throughout this journey,” he said.

“The training my sailors will receive will empower them to perform at their best. They will be ready to meet the challenges of delivering future capability, fight and win at sea.”

CSCS’ international training is coordinated through the command's Security Assistance and International Programs directorate.

“We share a special partnership with the RAN and CSCS International Programs is focused on facilitating an exchange of ideas, information and training material as we progress with the AWD program,” said Dr Darrell Tatro, director, CSCS International Programs.

“While the USN has more than thirty years of Aegis experience to share with the RAN, we are gaining much through lessons learned from this global partner.”

The mission of CSCS International Programs is to provide allied forces quality training to enable them to develop ready teams capable of operations that maintain and expertly employ surface combatants. The directorate partners with US training, readiness, and policy organisations, as well as other government agencies and industry to support international missions.