Lunch raises funds for cancer support

This article has photo gallery Published on LEUT Gary McHugh (author), ABIS Ronnie Baltoft (photographer)

Location(s): Claremont Showgrounds, WA

Topic(s): HMAS Stirling, Charities, Fundraising & Community

Chefs Bob Rawlings (left) and Roger Nowell (right) from Innovation Catering with Royal Australian Navy Chefs (L-R); Able Seaman Jack Halling, Seaman Harmony Brown, Seaman Murray Jones, Seaman Alexandra Hutton and Able Seaman Sean Price at the annual Breast Cancer Care WA Long Table Lunch at Claremont Showgrounds in Western Australia. (photo: ABIS Ronnie Baltoft)
Chefs Bob Rawlings (left) and Roger Nowell (right) from Innovation Catering with Royal Australian Navy Chefs (L-R); Able Seaman Jack Halling, Seaman Harmony Brown, Seaman Murray Jones, Seaman Alexandra Hutton and Able Seaman Sean Price at the annual Breast Cancer Care WA Long Table Lunch at Claremont Showgrounds in Western Australia.

For the 10th year running, HMAS Stirling was again a major participant in Breast Cancer Care WA’s (BCCWA) annual Long Table Lunch.

The event, held at Claremont Showgrounds, is BCCWA’s signature fundraising event where the food is prepared by some of the best chefs in Western Australia, including Navy chefs from Stirling.

This year, as well as providing a number of chefs and Maritime Logistics - Steward sailors to support the event, Stirling also supplied the music in the form of the Navy band.

Stirling Commanding Officer Captain Brian Delamont said the personnel involved in the event did Navy proud on the day.

“It was a spectacular event and every Navy member who was involved, especially the chefs and stewards, can be extremely proud of their contribution,” he said.

Breast Cancer Care WA Volunteer Coordinator Amy Hawkes said it was events such as the Long Table Lunch that allowed BCCWA to continue its valuable work.

“The Long Table Lunch is a very special event to us, and it takes the hard work and generosity of many sponsors, supporters and volunteers to bring it together,” she said.

“Each and every one of you who participated should feel incredibly proud of your contribution as you are the reason that BCCWA can continue to provide our services free-of-charge to Western Australians affected by breast cancer.”

Breast cancer is the most common cancer affecting women. Last year, it was estimated that more than 17,500 Australian women would be diagnosed with breast cancer.

Fortunately, factors such as early detection through regular mammograms, and improved treatment have greatly increased the survival rate for women diagnosed with breast cancer.