Australian sailor shines at Marine Corps Trials

This article has photo gallery Published on FLGOFF Amanda Scott (author)

Location(s): Camp Pendleton

Topic(s): Sport, Health, Fitness and Wellbeing, Swimming

Wing Commander O'Reilly, Corporal Scully, Able Seaman Condon and Corporal Mainey at the 'Wounded Warriors' United States Marine Corp trials. (photo: Unknown)
Wing Commander O'Reilly, Corporal Scully, Able Seaman Condon and Corporal Mainey at the 'Wounded Warriors' United States Marine Corp trials.

An Australian sailor has won two medals at the seventh annual Marine Corps Trials, joining hundreds of wounded, injured and ill US marines and current and former military personnel from across the globe. 

This included two Australian airmen, who Able Seaman Hydrographic Systems Operator Patrick Condon joined at the adaptive sports event held in San Diego at Camp Pendleton in early March.

More than 325 competitors attended the 12-day rehabilitative event hosted by the Marine Corps Wounded Warrior Regiment. 

They competed in sports ranging from swimming, track and cycling to wheelchair basketball, field shooting and sitting volleyball. 

The event, open to recovering service members of all skill levels, is designed to foster camaraderie and further rehabilitation. 

It is also used as the primary opportunity to select US Marine Corps participants for the US Department of Defence Warrior Games. 

Able Seaman Condon of HMAS Cairns competed in the swimming and shooting events. 

He won gold in the 50 metre freestyle and silver in the 4 x 50 metre freestyle. 

He said his preparation leading up to the trip included swimming, weights and cardio. 

“Sport has played a huge role in helping me sleep better and maintaining a healthy body and healthy mind,” Able Seaman Condon said. 

“It’s also given me a goal to aim towards and I feel better because of it. 

“The trip enabled me to experience other militaries, see how they conduct things on their base and meet a heap of new people. The camaraderie was amazing.” 

Team manager Wing Commander Ray O’Reilly said it was good to see all personnel give it their best effort and that they were prepared to give anything a go. 

“It didn’t matter what country, service or speciality individuals came from, everyone helped one another and encouraged others,” he said.