Building Navy’s future

This article has photo gallery Published on Department of Defence (author)

Topic(s): Establishments, Bases and Headquarters, Ships, Boats and Submarines

Minister for Defence Industry, Christopher Pyne (centre right) at the announcement of the Naval Shipbuilding Plan in the presence of Acting CDF, VADM Ray Griggs (left), Minister for Defence, Marise Payne, and Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull. (photo: CPL Colin Dadd)
Minister for Defence Industry, Christopher Pyne (centre right) at the announcement of the Naval Shipbuilding Plan in the presence of Acting CDF, VADM Ray Griggs (left), Minister for Defence, Marise Payne, and Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull.

The Federal Government released Australia’s first Naval Shipbuilding Plan recently in Adelaide outlining the nation’s largest ever program of naval shipbuilding and sustainment.
 
Chief of Navy Vice Admiral Tim Barrett said the plan, announced officially on 16 May, represented the most complex and technically challenging manufacturing endeavour Australia had ever contemplated.
 
Vice Admiral Barrett said the plan involved an investment of about $90 billion to deliver three continuous build programs to provide Navy with a continuous capability to fight and win at sea.
 
He said the continuous build program would provide a more cost-effective approach than disparate shipbuilding projects.
 
“Navy’s role will be fundamental to the success of the Plan and require Navy to reconsider how it conducts business over the coming decades,” Vice Admiral Barrett said.
 
“It will be essential that Navy does all it can to ensure that continuous shipbuilding provides a solid foundation to a capable, lethal and agile Navy.”
 
He said the complexity of the endeavour meant its success would rely on a large number of individual and interrelated initiatives to be implemented.
 
To assist in developing these initiatives, a plan that provides guidance on how Navy would contribute to the Naval Shipbuilding Plan will be released soon.
 
Speaking at the plan’s launch in Adelaide, the Minister for Defence Industry, Christopher Pyne, said it would ensure delivery of the modern defence capabilities set out in the 2016 Defence White Paper, creating thousands of jobs and securing the naval shipbuilding and sustainment industry for future generations of Australians.
 
“We are embarking on a great national endeavour,” Mr Pyne said.
 
“We will transform our naval shipbuilding and sustainment industry here in Australia, with Australian workers, in Australian shipyards, using Australian resources.”
 
As part of the plan, more than $1.3 billion will be invested in the modernisation of construction shipyards in South Australia and Western Australia.
 
Work will begin this year on the development of infrastructure at the Osborne Naval Shipyard in South Australia.
 
The Henderson Maritime Precinct in Western Australia will also be upgraded.
 
This will encompass construction of new cranes and heavy lift transportation capability, welding stations and upgrades to workshops and storage facilities, including new steel framed sheds.