Japanese Navy Surgeon General visits HMAS Penguin

This article has photo gallery Published on WOATV Ian Daley (author)

Location(s): HMAS Penguin

Commander Katherine Tindall and Petty Officer Medic Errol Campbell with Japanese medical officers following a tour of the Royal Australian Navy Medical School. (photo: Unknown)
Commander Katherine Tindall and Petty Officer Medic Errol Campbell with Japanese medical officers following a tour of the Royal Australian Navy Medical School.

The world class simulation capabilities at the Royal Australian Navy Medical School were on display recently when the Japanese Navy Surgeon General, Rear Admiral Sato made an official visit.

The medical school, housed at HMAS Penguin on Sydney Harbour, delivers a number of courses including that for ships’ medical emergency teams, minor war vessel medical care providers, in maritime operational health, underwater medicine clinicians and clinical managers.

Japanese medical officers spent a number of days with Senior Clinical Advisor at the Medical School, Commander Katherine Tindall discussing how the Australian Navy trains and treats personnel.

“It was a very informative and successful visit for both countries,” Commander Tindall said.

“By spending time sharing knowledge, we’ve been able to share valuable insights and showcase our state of the art medical training facilities.”

During his tour, Rear Admiral Sato was shown a simulated training scenario using the helicopter simulator as a platform to practice correct lifting techniques and command and control during flight operations.

A mass casualty exercise was also conducted by the ship’s medical emergency team instructors, led by Leading Seaman Medic Maddison Arton. Trainees demonstrated how to triage, provide care and clear the area of casualties.

Rear Admiral Sato and his contingent of medical officers were impressed with the state-of-the-art facilities. 

“The visit to Australia had been very informative. I have a lot of very practical and worthwhile medical training information to take back to Japan,” he said.

Commanding Officer Penguin, Commander Ian Campbell presented Rear Admiral Sato with a carved penguin to take back to Japan with him on completion of the visit.

“It was great to see the exchange of ideas and discussions on the approaches to medical training and delivery of medical support between Australia and Japan,” Commander Campbell said.

“The Admiral was very impressed at the professionalism of our ship’s medical emergency team trainees during their final assessment training,” he said.