$18,000 collected for Legacy in Cairns

Published on ABHSO Kate Jolley (author and photographer)

Location(s): Cairns, QLD

Topic(s): Charities, Fundraising & Community, Legacy

Chief Petty Officer Trevor Maybir and Leading Seaman Maxine Davidson volunteer at a Legacy stall at Cairns Central shopping centre. (photo: ABHSO Kate Jolley)
Chief Petty Officer Trevor Maybir and Leading Seaman Maxine Davidson volunteer at a Legacy stall at Cairns Central shopping centre.

Legacy week is a fundraising campaign held nationwide that appeals to members of the public to help raise money to support service personnel and their families through Legacy.

In April, Navy, Army and Legacy volunteers in Cairns stepped up to make a difference, and were stationed at six major shopping centres to sell merchandise and collect donations on behalf of Legacy.

They raised more than $18,000 dollars over three days. That money will now help to provide financial assistance to serving members that become medically incapacitated while serving in the Australian Defence Force, and also to the families of deceased service men and women.

With smiles on their faces, crisp white uniforms and an array of items available to purchase, Navy personnel were an attractive target for shoppers all over Cairns.

Tables were swarmed by those looking to buy a keepsake, or just to drop some money in the tin. Badges, teddy bears, wrist bands, pens and stubby coolers representing all three services were up for grabs. Commemorative pins represented past and present conflicts where Australians fought with pride all over the world.

Chief Petty Officer Trevor Maybir and Leading Seaman Maxine Davidson volunteer at Cairns Central shopping centre, selling merchandise for Legacy.

Chief Petty Officer Trevor Maybir and Leading Seaman Maxine Davidson volunteer at Cairns Central shopping centre, selling merchandise for Legacy.

“I volunteer for Legacy Week every year,” said Chief Petty Officer Trevor Maybir.

“It is great to see how much support there is out there for such a good cause,” he said.

Collectors scrutinised the vast selection of items available for purchase, looking for those sneaky badges that had eluded them before. The main drawcard was the pins, with a significant number of people wanting to wear them to Anzac Day commemorations.

One hundred thousand widows and 1900 children are currently benefitting from monies raised by Legacy and public support for the cause. Counselling, housing, education and medical assistance are just some of the services that Legacy provides.