Indonesian officers experience life in Leeuwin

This article has photo gallery Published on LEUT Ryan Zerbe (author), LSIS Kayla Jackson (photographer)

Topic(s): Surveying Ship (AGS), HMAS Leeuwin (A245)

Royal Australian Navy Able Seaman Electronic Technician Liam Warren (centre left) explains how to use a thermal imaging camera to Lieutenant Commander Dady Suryanegara and Lieutenants Agus Purnawan and Danar Pratama of the Indonesian Navy aboard HMAS Leeuwin. (photo: LSIS Kayla Jackson)
Royal Australian Navy Able Seaman Electronic Technician Liam Warren (centre left) explains how to use a thermal imaging camera to Lieutenant Commander Dady Suryanegara and Lieutenants Agus Purnawan and Danar Pratama of the Indonesian Navy aboard HMAS Leeuwin.

Three Indonesian Navy officers have experienced life at sea in the Royal Australian Navy Hydrographic Survey ship HMAS Leeuwin.

Cartographer, Lieutenant Commander Dady Suryanegara, Hydrographer, Lieutenant Danar Pratama, and Engineering Officer Lieutenant and Agus Purnawan joined the ship during its recent port visit to Jakarta for five days of sea riding.

The Indonesian officers spent their time in Leeuwin learning about Royal Australian Navy hydrographic survey practices and data analysis as well as fire-fighting techniques and engineering systems management.

Lieutenant Pratama said the general principles of hydrography applied to both navies but the data processing software aboard Leeuwin was interesting.

“I think our hydrographic operations are similar. We have the same standards and quality control from the International Hydrography Organisation, but the advanced technology here requires less time to process.

“This is my first time in HMAS Leeuwin and it is a very comfortable ship for its size,” Lieutenant Pratama said.

HMAS Leeuwin is currently on deployment in the South East Asia region, where she’s joined by Minehunter Coastal HMAS Diamantina.

Leeuwin’s Commanding Officer, Commander Richard Mortimer said the opportunity to embark three officers from Indonesia was beneficial to both navies and bolstered the ability to share hydrographic and engineering practices and processes.

“We work in a specialised maritime discipline common across navies around the world, so to be able to share knowledge with our Indonesian counterparts and learn from them benefits the field of hydrography as a whole.

“We share common maritime boundaries with our Indonesian neighbours and use common routes through the complex Archipelago. A significant part of doing that safely, is sharing knowledge and building interoperability with our regional partners,” Lieutenant Commander Mortimer said.

Leeuwin and Diamantina will spend two months deployed to Asia.

Both ships will visit Sri Lanka and then make their way back towards Australia via South East Asia, scheduled to return to their respective home ports in Cairns and Sydney around April.