High powered finish for indoor cricket comp

This article has photo gallery Published on LEUT Todd Fitzgerald (author), LSIS Brenton Friend (photographer)

Location(s): Five Dock Indoor Cricket

Topic(s): Sport, Cricket

The winners from Fleet Support Unit - High Power show off their trophy after competing in the Eastern Australia Area Cricket Competition at the Indoor Cricket Centre at Five Dock, Sydney. (photo: LSIS Brenton Freind)
The winners from Fleet Support Unit - High Power show off their trophy after competing in the Eastern Australia Area Cricket Competition at the Indoor Cricket Centre at Five Dock, Sydney.

The final of the Eastern Australia Area Indoor Cricket competition was a thrilling match with the result in the balance until the final ball.
 
Batting second, team ‘Fleet Support Unit - High Power’ took the lead from ‘Fleet Support Unit - Condition Monitoring’ on the second last ball, 71 runs to 70.
 
The game remained alive, however, because under the rules five runs could be deducted from the batting team’s tally for every dismissal. Condition Monitoring needed a wicket off the last ball to win.
 
They almost got it, too, but the umpire waved away their appeal for leg before wicket.
 
Despite the controversial decision, Condition Monitoring captain Leading Seaman Marine Technician Regan Stone said the match was tough but played in the right spirit.
 
“The last batting pair for the High Power won it for them with a five hit on the second last ball and a controversial final ball that could have been called LBW but the umpire wasn't feeling generous,” Leading Seaman Stone said.
 
The game was a low scoring affair with good fielding from both teams.
 
“Good sportsmanship was witnessed on both sides as we both work closely at Fleet Support Unit and are competitors in most sporting competitions.”
 
This is the second year the Eastern Australian Indoor Cricket competition has been played.
 
Rules included eight players per side, 16 overs per innings, all fielders to bowl two overs but not consecutively, batting partners to face four overs no matter how many times they are dismissed and every dismissal is five runs deducted from the overall scoring total.
 
Sport, individual fitness and adventure training is playing a growing part in Navy’s strategy to build confidence and resilience in personnel.
 
In each of these venues, personnel test their boundaries and develop greater self confidence and commitment to the team.
 
Petty Officer Marine Technician Michael Robertson won best and fairest for High Power while Able Seaman Marine Technician Kelly Chilton took the award for Condition Monitoring.

Marine Technicians Leading Seaman Luke McKinnon and Leading Seaman Stone starred with the bat for Condition Monitoring.