Brave crew recognised for extraordinary acts of gallantry in 1942

This article has photo gallery Published on LEUT Kate Mathias (author)

Location(s): Yarra River, Melbourne

Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia, Her Excellency, The Honourable Quentin Bryce AC CVO, inspects a Royal Guard from HMAS Cerberus accompanied by the Royal Guard Commander, Lieutenant Commander Peter Arnold RAN during the HMAS Yarra II Unit Citation for Gallantry Investiture Ceremony  held at the Port of Melbourne, Victoria.  (photo: Able Seaman Tom Gibson)
Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia, Her Excellency, The Honourable Quentin Bryce AC CVO, inspects a Royal Guard from HMAS Cerberus accompanied by the Royal Guard Commander, Lieutenant Commander Peter Arnold RAN during the HMAS Yarra II Unit Citation for Gallantry Investiture Ceremony held at the Port of Melbourne, Victoria.

Proud descendants of the Ship's Company of HMAS Yarra (II) looked on today as Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Ray Griggs AO, CSC, RAN proudly accepted a Unit Citation for Gallantry awarded to the crew of HMAS Yarra (II) for acts of extraordinary gallantry in action in 1942. 

Presented by the Governor General, Her Excellency the Honourable Quentin Bryce AC, CVO, the citation details a series of events that commenced on the 5th of February 1942, when a convoy about to enter Singapore harbour was attacked by Japanese aircraft and the troop transport Empress of Asia was severely damaged.  

Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Ray Griggs AO, CSC, RAN presents Mrs Pam Shirley, relative of Fallen Ship Mate from  HMAS Yarra II,  with a Copy of the Unit Citation for acts of extraordinary gallantry in action in 1942 at the Port of Melbourne, Victoria.

Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Ray Griggs AO, CSC, RAN presents Mrs Pam Shirley, relative of Fallen Ship Mate from HMAS Yarra II, with a Copy of the Unit Citation for acts of extraordinary gallantry in action in 1942 at the Port of Melbourne, Victoria.

Despite the threat from continuing air attacks and the explosions in the Empress of Asia, HMAS Yarra’s Commanding Officer, Commander Wilfred Hastings Harrington, RAN, manoeuvred the ship alongside the stern of the sinking transport, enabling 1334 men to be directly transferred across to YarraYarra then proceeded to rescue a further 470 men from life rafts and floats.  

On the 4th of March 1942, Yarra and her convoy of three merchant vessels were proceeding to Fremantle.  In the early hours of the morning, Yarra’s lookouts sighted a Japanese surface action group.  Each individual Japanese warship was greatly superior to Yarra in fighting strength and speed.  Despite this, Yarra’s newly appointed Commanding Officer, who assumed command on 11 February 1942, Lieutenant Commander Robert William Rankin, RAN, immediately manoeuvred the ship between the enemy and the convoy, made smoke to screen the convoy and closed to engage. 

At the ceremony, the Chief of Navy spoke of their bravery. 

"Collective gallantry is the most prized achievement in Navy. The crew of Yarra served the nation; they did so with extraordinary gallantry, skill and conspicuous devotion to duty; they did so as one company, even to death," Vice Admiral Griggs said.

When it was obvious the ship was about to sink, the order to abandon ship was given.  Despite this order the last remaining gun crew continued to engage the enemy until silenced by direct fire. Of 151 crew members, only 13 survived.

More imagery is available on the Royal Australian Navy Media Library at http://images.navy.gov.au/S20140492.

 

The crew of HMAS Yarra IV 'cheer ship' at the presentation of the Unit Citation of Gallantry at the investiture ceremony for HMAS Yarra II in Melbourne Victoria.

The crew of HMAS Yarra IV 'cheer ship' at the presentation of the Unit Citation of Gallantry at the investiture ceremony for HMAS Yarra II in Melbourne Victoria.