Rising star, above and beyond

Published on LS James McDougall (author), POIS Nina Fogliani (photographer)

Topic(s): Honours, Awards and Trophies

Seaman Communications and Information Systems Rhiannon Cadogan and Petty Officer Communications and Information Systems Emily Dorey conducting lights and signals training at the Defence Force School of Signals - Maritime Wing in HMAS Cerberus, Victoria. (photo: POIS Nina Fogliani)
Seaman Communications and Information Systems Rhiannon Cadogan and Petty Officer Communications and Information Systems Emily Dorey conducting lights and signals training at the Defence Force School of Signals - Maritime Wing in HMAS Cerberus, Victoria.

Now in its second year, Australian Defence Magazine’s Women in Defence Awards will hold their award ceremony in Canberra in July 2019.

The awards recognise women in seven categories including Communications, Legal/Contracting, Project Management, Engineering, Technical Trade, People and Culture, and the Rising Star.

Nominees in the 2019 awards come from all three Defence services, as well as the Australian Public Service, Defence Industry and veteran support bodies. 

Forty-two Royal Australian Navy nominations were submitted with six Navy members shortlisted in five categories.

Petty Officer Communications Information Systems Emily Dorey.

Petty Officer Communications Information Systems Emily Dorey.

The Royal Australian Navy’s own Petty Officer Communications Information Systems sailor Emily Dorey is in the running for the rising star award.

Petty Officer Dorey, who works at the Defence Force School of Signals Maritime Communications Information Systems Wing at HMAS Cerberus has progressed quickly through the ranks due to her level of professionalism, devotion to her duties, mentoring of others and commitment to external activities to the highest order.

Not happy with just doing her job, Petty Officer Dorey constantly strives to perform above and beyond what’s expected of her, immersing herself into additional roles and training in areas such as Alcohol and Drugs advisor, Equity, and Diversity & Inclusion in the workplace.

She consistently volunteers at HMAS Cerberus to perform a variety of roles that sit outside of her day-to day job responsibilities. These have included working at Recruit School quiz nights, supporting the Women’s AFL team, and being a visible supporter of both Women in Defence and Youth Leadership activities.

With respect to mentoring others, Petty Officer Dorey said that there was no better feeling than helping somebody else succeed. 

“You can work hard for your own successes, but it’s just a different feeling working hard for somebody else to be able to achieve something that they thought they couldn’t,” she said.

“As an instructor at the Defence Force School of Signals, I have worked with Able Seamen that were convinced the level of knowledge required was out of their reach.

“You know it’s worth the effort and extra work when at the completion of this course you see someone who is not just competent, but who is actually confident in their own abilities,” Petty Officer Dorey said.

Not content with just being a role model for junior sailors, Emily is also a volunteer ‘Emergency Responder’ for the Victorian State Emergency Services (SES) – a time consuming and challenging role.

Petty Officer Dorey said the motivation for volunteering for the SES came when her best friend lost her little boy on Boxing Day 2013.

Feeling extremely stressed, they searched for the boy. There was also SES volunteers looking for him.

“Complete strangers giving up their time, time with family on Boxing Day, to help us.

“I thought to myself: I am completely capable and able, so why not, why am I not helping my community?” Petty Officer Dorey said.

Then she volunteered to do just that.

The Australian Defence Magazine - Women in Defence Awards will be presented during a Gala Awards Dinner at the National Arboretum, Canberra, on 11 July 2019. Secure your tickets at http://admwomenindefenceawards.com.au/.