Joint Service Police Group launched

This article has photo gallery Published on LEUT Dave Devlin (author)

Topic(s): Ceremony and Traditions

Chief Of Staff ADHQ Brig Georgina Whelan, assisted by Acting Provost Martial Australian Defence Force Lieutenant Colonel Nick Surtees and Command Warrant Officer Joint Service Police Group Warrant Officer Naval Police Coxswain Shannon Power. (photo: Unknown)
Chief Of Staff ADHQ Brig Georgina Whelan, assisted by Acting Provost Martial Australian Defence Force Lieutenant Colonel Nick Surtees and Command Warrant Officer Joint Service Police Group Warrant Officer Naval Police Coxswain Shannon Power.

Military policing across the Australian Defence Force has a new moniker to better reflect the responsibilities of their modern role.
 
Ten years on from the establishment of the Australian Defence Force Investigative Service on 16 May 2007, the team have emerged as the the Joint Service Police Group.
 
Following the recommendations of a Senate committee report on the effectiveness of Australia’s military justice system, single service investigative units were merged into the organisation known commonly by its acronym ‘ADFIS’.
 
As the unit’s functions grew, so did the size and overarching governance of the organisations’ headquarters activities that supported on-ground investigative teams.
 
In 2016, the Chiefs of Service Committee considered and approved specific improvements to the Joint Service Police capability, for a professional and effective capability supporting wider Defence cultural reforms.
 
The Chiefs of Service Committee also approved the re-naming of the organisation to the Joint Service Police Group, with the ADFIS title only reflective of that sub-element purely focused on investigations.
 
Acting Provost Marshall Australian Defence Force, Lieutenant Colonel Nick Surtees, said the renaming better described the capability delivered by the organisation in its entirety.
 
“The change in name allows us to be recognised as a professional, agile and innovative organisation that strengthens our relationships with those agencies, both internal and externally, that we work closely with on a daily basis,” he said.
 
Command Warrant Officer Joint Service Police Group, Warrant Officer Naval Police Coxswain Shannon Power, said it was an exciting time.
 
“We are working towards further development of commonality amongst the Joint Service Police community, and this will provide greater employment opportunities for our people as we go forward,” Warrant Officer Power said.
 
Naval Police Coxswains are employed primarily to provide a policing capability to the Royal Australian Navy. The role encompasses law enforcement and the maintenance of good order and discipline.
 
Naval Police Coxswains can be selected to serve as Investigator with the Joint Service Police Group.
 
They serve across the country and overseas in a variety of roles to manage and conduct complex and major investigations on behalf of the Chief of the Defence Force.