Engineering focus in Cerberus

This article has photo gallery Published on SBLT Katherine Mulheron (author), LSIS Dove Smithett (photographer)

Location(s): HMAS Cerberus, VIC

Lieutenant Commander Alan Donovan (right) is supported by Lieutenant Rory Lea on a virtual simulator fighting a fire presented by Deakin University during the Engineering Training Week held at HMAS Cerberus, Victoria.  (photo: LSIS Dove Smithett)
Lieutenant Commander Alan Donovan (right) is supported by Lieutenant Rory Lea on a virtual simulator fighting a fire presented by Deakin University during the Engineering Training Week held at HMAS Cerberus, Victoria.

It was all hands to engineering stations in HMAS Cerberus recently, with the annual Engineering Training Week. 

The activity brings together engineering and maintenance disciplines for forums and presentations on the strategic direction of Naval Engineering. 

Engineers types from all ranks and specialities, including Australian Public Service engineers and contractors, congregated to focus on improvements to training and career development. 

Opening the week of presentations and discussion, Head of Naval Engineering, Rear Admiral Michael Uzzell, highlighted the importance of building naval engineering capability. 

He emphasised that with such a large group of engineers in the one location, it was a unique opportunity to invite non-Defence authorities to present on new technologies that may support further development in naval engineering training and capability.

Representing the Institute for Intelligent Systems Research Innovation at Deakin University, Dr James Mullins shared his organisations work in providing solutions for real world problems through Robotics and Haptics by featuring one of the institutions new pieces of simulation equipment. 

The Haptically Enabled Hot Fire Training System, or FLAIMTRAINER, was developed to provide realistic hot fire training simulation without using water and is a remarkable example of using system modelling and simulation research to develop supporting training methods. 

Lieutenant Commander Alan Donovan from Training Authority – Submarines took the opportunity to test out the FLAIMTRAINER and experience how the field of simulation might be applied to fire training methods within Navy and Emergency Services.

“This was a very interesting experience; a great mix of real world and simulation,” Lieutenant Commander Donovan said.

“It’s a game-changer for training.”

A key recommendation of the Plan to Reform Support Ships Repair and Management Practises Rizzo Review in 2011 was the proposal to Rebuild Naval Engineering Capability, which is one of the catalysts for hosting the Engineering Training Week.

The event is now in its second year and has enabled a greater understanding of what has been achieved within the naval engineering space and how future changes will continue to support capability and seaworthiness.