Gold is in the bag for Aussie Paralympics team

This article has photo gallery Published on LEUT Todd Fitzgerald (author), LSIS Peter Thompson (photographer)

Able Seaman Electronics Technician Daniel Hines, Lieutenant Stacey Moore and Able Seaman Combat Systems Operator Jackson Cosgrove (at right) of HMAS Kuttabul, with Outfitting Manager for the Australian Paralympic Committee, Kate Smith, are managing the supply and issue of uniforms to Australian athletes competing in the Rio 2016 Paralympics, from a logistics facility in Silverwater, NSW.  (photo: LSIS Peter Thompson)
Able Seaman Electronics Technician Daniel Hines, Lieutenant Stacey Moore and Able Seaman Combat Systems Operator Jackson Cosgrove (at right) of HMAS Kuttabul, with Outfitting Manager for the Australian Paralympic Committee, Kate Smith, are managing the supply and issue of uniforms to Australian athletes competing in the Rio 2016 Paralympics, from a logistics facility in Silverwater, NSW.

Eight Royal Australian Navy members have been involved in one of the most important parts of the Australian Paralympic Team’s Rio Games campaign – the packing the team’s uniforms.

Chef de Mission, Kate McLoughlin, said Navy's assistance was vital to preparations for the Australian Paralympic Committee.

“Receiving an Australian uniform is a goal that all aspiring Paralympic athletes strive for,” Ms McLoughlin said.

“To pack bags for the entire Paralympic Team is a huge logistical challenge for our organisation. 

"We must pack 345 bags with a combined total of more than 10,000 items.

"Every bag is meticulously prepared, and in many cases, the contents of each bag can be the difference between victory and defeat in Rio.”

The bags will be issued to each member of the Australian Paralympic Team - athletes and officials. 

Each bag contains items ranging from uniforms for the opening and closing ceremonies, and casual and competition wear. 

There were also medical supplies, including compression wear, and insect repellent to combat the threat of mosquitoes in Rio. 

Navy volunteer, Lieutenant Stacey Moore said it was an honour to help the athletes.

“I feel like it is an extension of my job in the Navy, serving our countrymen and women,” she said.

The Australian Paralympic Committee and the Australian Defence Force collaborate in several areas, including working to introduce Defence members who are injured during their service to Paralympic sport.

Lieutenant Moore was joined by Able Seamen Electronics Technicians Daniel Hines, Brayden Wilson, Jackson Cosgrove and Michael Geue, Able Seaman Boatswains Mate Nathen Rutland, Able Seaman Marine Technician Chris Tomas, and Able Seaman Combat Systems Operator Keiran Bowes.