A force multiplier - Navy commits to 100 Days For Change

Published on LEUT Anthony Martin (author), ABIS Christopher Szumlanski (photographer)

Topic(s): 100 Days For Change

(R-L) Seaman Boatswains Mate Emily Xar, Seaman Boatswains Mate Jessica Love-Lace, Seaman Boatswains Mate Tayla Stark, Seaman Communication and Information Systems Samantha Waller, and Seaman Boatswains Mate Jordan Moloney on the messenger line during a replenishment at sea between HMAS Adelaide, HMAS Success and HMNZS Te Mana while sailing to Hawaii to take part in Exercise RIMPAC 18. (photo: )
(R-L) Seaman Boatswains Mate Emily Xar, Seaman Boatswains Mate Jessica Love-Lace, Seaman Boatswains Mate Tayla Stark, Seaman Communication and Information Systems Samantha Waller, and Seaman Boatswains Mate Jordan Moloney on the messenger line during a replenishment at sea between HMAS Adelaide, HMAS Success and HMNZS Te Mana while sailing to Hawaii to take part in Exercise RIMPAC 18.
Navy is participating in a national campaign to highlight the importance and achievements of women and diversity within our ranks.
 
100 Days For Change will run from 1 July to 8 October 2018. The program aims to strengthen the momentum for individuals to improve the Navy’s operational effectiveness by committing to gender equality and equity at all levels. 
 
Statistically, 21.3% of Navy’s workforce is female. Women and men serve alongside each other at sea and ashore and they have done so since World War One. Deputy Chief of Navy, Rear Admiral Mark Hammond said that’s a statistic Navy can be proud of, but more needs to be done.
 
“Navy’s future is very bright, but we are yet to fully capitalise upon all of the inherent strengths of our diverse workforce, and to fully leverage the potential of the entire Australian recruiting pool,” he said.
 
“With the imminent arrival of new capabilities, we need to grow the overall size of our workforce. 
 
“We can only achieve this by becoming an employer of choice that  welcomes workforce diversity and inclusion,” Rear Admiral Hammond said.
 
The 100 Days For Change is an initiative by Women and Leadership Australia (www.wla.edu.au), and is supported by the Australian Gender Equity Council and the Workplace Gender Equality Agency. The program challenges all Navy people to make a commitment or pledge to appropriate change – as an individual or at unit level. Examples include holding a workplace conversation about the Diversity and Inclusion strategy and 100 Days For Change; attending/participating/supporting a women’s sporting event; reviewing orders, instructions, and procedures to overcome gender bias; taking a campus course on unconscious bias; celebrate commitments and promote 100 Days For Change in your workplace.
 
“We must do this as one Navy, regardless of age, rank, race, religion, sexual orientation, ability or gender,” Rear Admiral Hammond said. 
 
“We cannot afford to leave anyone behind. Diversity and inclusion is a force multiplier.”
 
Further information for Navy members can be found via the Navy Women’s Strategic Advisor (NWSA) webpage: http://drnet/navy/navywomensstrategy/Pages/Home.aspx and the July-October 2018 Compass Divisional packs.
 
Pledges can be sent to: navy.diversity@defence.gov.au