Warfighting stocks strengthened

Published on SBLT Brendan Taylor (author), ABIS Chantell Brown (photographer)

Location(s): HMAS Watson

Topic(s): HMAS Watson, Ships, Boats and Submarines, Training Authority - Maritime Warfare

(Front R-L) Head of Command Navigation and Littoral Warfare, CMDR Darron Rowe, Head Navy Capability RADM Jonathan Mead, and Director Training Authority Maritime Warfare, CAPT Craig Powell, with graduates. (photo: ABIS Chantell Brown)
(Front R-L) Head of Command Navigation and Littoral Warfare, CMDR Darron Rowe, Head Navy Capability RADM Jonathan Mead, and Director Training Authority Maritime Warfare, CAPT Craig Powell, with graduates.

Thirty-six maritime warfare officers were recently awarded their Bridge Warfare Certificates after graduating from Junior Warfare Application Course 63 in a ceremony held at HMAS Watson in Sydney.
 
Head Navy Capability Rear Admiral Jonathan Mead represented Chief of Navy as the guest of honour at the ceremony on 16 June.
 
The intense course teaches junior officers how to drive and fight Australia’s Fleet of warships and takes approximately two years. 
 
Officers work as the Commanding Officer’s representative, responsible for the control and safety of the vessels at sea and in port. 
 
One member of the largest class to graduate to date, Sub Lieutenant Mathew Dodds, said he could not wait to join the Fleet and showcase his new set of skills.
 
“The numerous long hours were all worth it in the end, and I am so excited to join my new ship and test my new abilities,” he said.
 
The Junior Warfare Application Course is conducted in four phases.
 
Phase One is held at Watson and teaches the basics of a employment, such as how to keep watches on the bridge of a warship, relative velocity calculations and knowledge to prevent collisions at sea. 
 
Trainees then spend 22 weeks at sea on a large ship consolidating what they have learned.
 
The officers return to Watson and are taught more complex navigation, bridge management and mariner skills, including a period of training in the bridge simulator.
 
They are then posted to a small vessel for 22 weeks to prepare for their major test - Fleet Board and the award of the Navigation Watchkeeping Certificate.
 
The final 28 weeks includes the leadership and management training, warfare theory and the bridge simulator, teaching trainees complex war fighting tactics techniques and procedures.