New sim to keep Navy communicators at the cutting edge

Published on LEUT Sarah West (author), ABIS Bonny Gassner (photographer)

Location(s): HMAS Cerberus, VIC

Topic(s): Training, HMAS Cerberus

Royal Australian Navy trainees utilise the newly built Communications Centre Simulator at the Defence Force School of Signals - Maritime Wing at HMAS Cerberus. (photo: ABIS Bonny Gassner)
Royal Australian Navy trainees utilise the newly built Communications Centre Simulator at the Defence Force School of Signals - Maritime Wing at HMAS Cerberus.

A new simulator at the Defence Force School of Signals Maritime Wing at HMAS Cerberus will ensure Navy’s newest Communications and Information Systems sailors will join their first ships much better prepared for the rigours of operating at sea.

The learning system simulator was developed by Australian company Cirrus and was accepted by the School of Signals in December. It will be used for the first time during a pilot course due to be conducted in mid-2019.

Commodore Training, Commodore Justin Jones said the simulator would greatly enhance Navy’s capabilities across a range of dynamic maritime operations.

“Our focus is on being a thinking Navy, a fighting Navy and an Australian Navy in all that we do and this requires us to provide our people with best-practice training to prepare them for success throughout their careers,” Commodore Jones said. 

“Communicators are critical to the success of our Fleet as we operate in an increasingly dynamic maritime domain, regularly in task groups with ships, aircraft and troops on the ground, conducting operations that protect the security and interests of our nation and its people.”

“This demands us to be able to transmit, receive and process more information than we ever have before, faster than we ever have before, and this simulator is about getting our people up to speed so that we can fight and win at sea,” he said.

The simulator is based on a generic communication centre in an enhanced frigate and is designed to mimic the operational environment at sea, using real-life scenarios that may be encountered by communicators embarked in Major Fleet Units.

The training package will enable self-paced learning, with instructors able to monitor and provide help when needed.

Scenarios will require students to complete tasks within Fleet standard timeframes, with the system able to assess the trainees’ performance and track their progress.

In the future, the simulator will be used to support training and assessment for basic communications operator courses through to advanced courses.

Additional imagery is available at: http://images.defence.gov.au/DM20190194