Cadet adventures inspire Navy careers

Published on CPO Anthony Martin (author), LSIS Nina Fogliani (photographer)

Location(s): HMAS Cerberus

Topic(s): Australian Navy Cadets, Recruit School, Emms Division, HMAS Cerberus

The reviewing Officer for the Graduation Parade, Commodore Training Commodore Justin Jones, CSC, RAN with graduates from General Entry 358 Emms Division who are also ex-cadets from Waratah Flotilla, NSW. Recruits (L-R) Bethany East, Ashley Buurveld, Caroline Greene and Lachlan Meuron.

 (photo: LSIS Nina Fogliani)
The reviewing Officer for the Graduation Parade, Commodore Training Commodore Justin Jones, CSC, RAN with graduates from General Entry 358 Emms Division who are also ex-cadets from Waratah Flotilla, NSW. Recruits (L-R) Bethany East, Ashley Buurveld, Caroline Greene and Lachlan Meuron.
Bonds forged in the Navy cadets have led four sailors into full-time careers after graduating from the Royal Australian Navy Recruit course.
 
The former cadets from Waratah Division in Southern New South Wales are now known as Seaman Bethany East, Ashley Buurveld, Caroline Greene, and Lachlan Meuron.
 
They marched out of Recruit School at HMAS Cerberus in December last year. The sailors were among the 111 recruits at the Graduation Parade for General Entry 358 Emms Division.
 
Together with their former Division colleagues, all four are now undertaking a range of seagoing and shore-based postings for category training.
 
Seaman Ashlee Buurveld, a former TS Canberra Cadet, is currently training as a Maritime Logistics – Cook.
 
“My time in the Australian Navy Cadets definitely influenced my decision to join the RAN. I enjoyed the structure and lifestyle; we visited many ships during my time which also contributed,” she said.
 
Commodore Mark Hill, Director General Australian Navy Cadets and Reserves congratulated the four graduates on making the step into the full-time ranks.
 
“Cadets have a real passion for the Navy and it is always heartening when you see those who pursue a career into Navy life,” Commodore Hill said.
 
“Becoming a Navy Cadet means making new friends, being part of a team that values you and experiencing challenges that will develop your potential as a leader.
 
“I wish them all the very best for their career in the Navy.”
 
There are more than 2,400 Cadets and in excess of 450 Staff across Australia in 97 Training Ships. Many Australian Navy Cadet (ANC) Training Ships are located in isolated or inland areas where the ANC provides the most visible link between the Navy and the community.
 
For more information about Australian Navy Cadets visit http://www.navy.gov.au/about/organisation/cadets.