Battle Tanker - A multi-role capability

This article has photo gallery Published on LEUT Anthea Baczkowski (author), ABIS Jake Badior (author)

Topic(s): Operation MANITOU

Federation German Ship Luebeck alongside HMAS Success during a Replenishment at Sea while deployed in the Middle East Region on Operation Manitou. (photo: Able Seaman Jake Badior)
Federation German Ship Luebeck alongside HMAS Success during a Replenishment at Sea while deployed in the Middle East Region on Operation Manitou.

HMAS Success is showing her versatility in a multi-role capacity while deployed to Operation MANITOU in the Middle East Region. 

Commanding Officer Captain Justin Jones met with a small team from Combined Maritime Forces during a port visit recently to discuss his ship’s role.

In what was an Australian affair, his Combined Maritime Forces counterparts included the Australian Navy’s Captain Nick Stoker as the Chief of Staff and Deputy Commander Combined Task Force 150, Captain Michael Turner as Director Operations, along with international counterparts Lieutenant Commander Mike Stefanson, Royal Canadian Navy and Major Don Phillip, Royal Canadian Air Force. 

“We discussed the planned roles that Success will be required to undertake during its time on operations in the region,” Captain Jones said. 

“It was during these discussions that the potential for Success to be utilised for a broader range of operational tasking was realised.

Director Operations for Combined Maritime Forces, Captain Michael Turner (left) with  Commanding Officer HMAS Success, Captain Justin Jones, (centre) and Chief of Staff/Deputy Commander Combined Task Force 150, Captain Nick Stoker met for Combined Maritime Force briefs in Muscat, Oman.

Director Operations for Combined Maritime Forces, Captain Michael Turner (left) with Commanding Officer HMAS Success, Captain Justin Jones, (centre) and Chief of Staff/Deputy Commander Combined Task Force 150, Captain Nick Stoker met for Combined Maritime Force briefs in Muscat, Oman.

“HMAS Success is a capable and adaptable ship with a well-trained crew which possesses many skills and capabilities outside of those required to successfully undertake its core role of logistics sustainment at sea. 

“Success has demonstrated its flexibility and capacity to adapt to the developing nature of its mission many times during its deployment thus far and revealed the true capacity of the potential inherent in the ship and her crew.

 “It is satisfying that we are now able to demonstrate that Success is far more than an accomplished supply ship and that we can contribute to the mission sets for multiple task forces.”

The Combined Maritime Forces is a multi-national naval partnership which exists to promote security, stability and prosperity across approximately 2.5 million square miles of international waters in the Middle East encompassing some of the world’s most important shipping lanes. 

Their main focus areas are defeating terrorism, preventing piracy, encouraging regional cooperation and promoting a safe maritime environment, is made up of 30 nations and comprises three task forces, including Combined Task Force 150 which is primarily focused on maritime security and counter-terrorism. 

The contribution from each country varies depending on its ability to contribute assets and the availability of those assets at any given time. 

In Success’s case, it is able to contribute to both logistical and other direct tactical support to the operation. 

Success has a Level 2 boarding capability and has been tasked to conduct numerous approach and assist boardings as well as broader maritime engagement since joining the Combined Maritime Forces. 

The embarked Seahawk helicopter, ‘Odin’, has been utilised on a daily basis to conduct surface-search missions and provide information about vessels in the area.

While Success is contributing to counter-terrorism and counter-smuggling operations, providing logistical support to coalition ships remains her primary tasking.