Australian training in focus for Indonesian Officers

This article has photo gallery Published on LEUT Ryan Zerbe (author and photographer)

Topic(s): Training

Seamanship Training Manger Lieutenant James Kerin explains the Royal Australian Navy’s training continuum for Boatswain sailors to a delegation of officers from the Indonesian National Army Navy, led by Head Indonesian Navy Training/Education Command Colonel Ivan Yulivan. (photo: LEUT Ryan Zerbe)
Seamanship Training Manger Lieutenant James Kerin explains the Royal Australian Navy’s training continuum for Boatswain sailors to a delegation of officers from the Indonesian National Army Navy, led by Head Indonesian Navy Training/Education Command Colonel Ivan Yulivan.

A delegation of senior officers from the Indonesian Navy has visited Australian Defence Force establishments to better understand training practices.

The visiting officers, led by the Head of the Indonesian Navy’s Training and Education Command, Commodore Ivan Yulivan, toured bases in New South Wales and Victoria during their time in Australia.

They visited the Command, Navigation and Littoral Warfare, and Maritime Warfare faculties at HMAS Watson at South Head for an in-depth view of how the Royal Australian Navy trains its warfare and navigation specialists. The delegation also visited Fleet Base East near Woolloomooloo where they examined collective training procedures and the seaworthiness systems designed to uphold a ready fleet capability.

They toured the School of Ship Safety and Survivability and seamanship training areas at HMAS Cerberus south of Melbourne and were able to watch technical sailors compete in the National Finals of the 2018 Navy Engineering Challenge, including a robotics competition.

Australian Naval Attaché to Jakarta, Captain Matt Brown, said Commodore Yulivan’s visit to Australia was focussed on learning more about the Royal Australian Navy’s systemic and policy-driven approach to training.

“There are many opportunities for the Indonesian and Australian navies to work more closely together, including with individual and collective training,” he said

“It was great to be able to bring this delegation to Australia and demonstrate our approach and systems.”

“CDRE Yulivan was impressed by the thoroughness of the Australian Navy’s training continuums and the extensive use of simulation systems.

“He wants to find ways to work together, particularly with collective training,” said CAPT Brown.

Australia’s Navy training needs have shifted in recent years with more new recruits and officers needed to crew an expanding fleet increasingly operating in task groups.

Warfare personnel generally complete their training in Sydney before joining a fleet unit at Fleet Base East while personnel in technical trade roles and maritime logistic support positions complete their training at HMAS Cerberus.