Stirling gets early spring clean

This article has photo gallery Published on LEUT Gary McHugh (author), LSIS Ronnie Baltoft (photographer)

Location(s): HMAS Stirling, WA

Topic(s): HMAS Stirling

L-R: Royal Australian Navy sailors Able Seaman Combat Systems Operator Shamira Altschwager; Chief Petty Officer Combat Systems Manager Mel Dennett; Leading Seaman Combat Systems Operator Stacey Hooper; and Commanding Officer HMAS Stirling, Captain Ainsley Morthorpe, CSM, RAN, collect rubbish during the 'Clean Up Stirling Day' activity on board HMAS Stirling, WA. (photo: LSIS Ronnie Baltoft)
L-R: Royal Australian Navy sailors Able Seaman Combat Systems Operator Shamira Altschwager; Chief Petty Officer Combat Systems Manager Mel Dennett; Leading Seaman Combat Systems Operator Stacey Hooper; and Commanding Officer HMAS Stirling, Captain Ainsley Morthorpe, CSM, RAN, collect rubbish during the 'Clean Up Stirling Day' activity on board HMAS Stirling, WA.

HMAS Stirling is looking more pristine than usual after a recent whole-of-base clean up to celebrate 41 years of service.

Stirling, located on Garden Island in Western Australia, is Navy’s largest base.

Captain Ainsley Morthorpe, Stirling’s Commanding Officer, said turning 41 was a significant event in the life of a naval base and should be marked accordingly.

“Our commitment to caring for Garden Island is enshrined in our charter and as such - every officer, sailor and civilian working on the island is committed to maintaining the unique ecosystem that exists here.

“The combined efforts of all who participated in today’s clean-up made a huge job manageable, and the enthusiasm displayed in carrying out the job resulted in a significant amount of rubbish being removed from our island,” he said.

Captain Morthorpe estimated that more than 200 bags of rubbish were removed from the base, which is currently undergoing a significant period of construction as part of the HMAS Stirling 3A project.

Warrant Officer Glen Wright, Stirling’s Command Warrant Officer, praised the participation rate and the way those involved went about the job.

“The participation in the clean-up from all civilian and Defence members from all units, lodger units and workplaces was outstanding.

“Bravo Zulu to all who took the time out to get involved,” Warrant Officer Wright said.

Stirling was named in honour of Captain James Stirling of the Royal Navy, who landed on Garden Island in 1827.

The base was originally constructed as an intermediate maintenance base for four destroyer escorts and three submarines.

Stirling has grown considerably over the past 41 years and is now home to half of Navy’s Anzac Class frigates, underway supply ship HMAS Sirius, Navy’s entire Collins Class submarine squadron, a number of auxiliary support vessels and various land-based lodger units.

Imagery is available on the Navy Image Gallery: http://images.navy.gov.au/S20191842.