Bushrangers in the Cradle of the Navy

This article has photo gallery Published on LEUT Ben Willee (author), LSIS Nina Fogliani (photographer), Jonathon Rundell (photographer)

Location(s): HMAS Cerberus, VIC

Topic(s): HMAS Cerberus

HMAS Cerberus Command Warrant Officer, Warrant Officer Michael Connors, (front row 4th from right), and Leading Seaman Acoustic Warfare Analyst Submarines Ryan Robertson (front row 5th from right), with players and coaches from Victorian Bushrangers cricket team during their development camp at HMAS Cerberus, Victoria.  (photo: POIS Nina Fogliani)
HMAS Cerberus Command Warrant Officer, Warrant Officer Michael Connors, (front row 4th from right), and Leading Seaman Acoustic Warfare Analyst Submarines Ryan Robertson (front row 5th from right), with players and coaches from Victorian Bushrangers cricket team during their development camp at HMAS Cerberus, Victoria.

Players from Cricket Victoria this week experienced a three day training camp at HMAS Cerberus as part of their pre-season training. Facilitated by Bravery Trust, this gruelling three day event included fire, flood, swim test, teamwork exercises and lots of physical training. The camp showcased the challenges of Navy training and demonstrated the many similarities between military operations and elite sport. 

The Cricket Victoria team, sometimes called the Bushrangers, had an objective of bringing together their newer players and building a sense of team with the existing players. Cerberus serves as the primary training establishment for sailors so is sometimes referred to as the 'Cradle of the Navy'.

Petty Officer Physical Training Instructor Joe Carroll said the event highlighted many of the similarities of both organisations.

“Two different cultures, the military and professional cricketers. It’s been a great chance for us to work with the younger players (who have just come out of the academy) and get them meshed with the professionals you see on your TV every summer,” POPTI Carroll said. 

There are many similarities with both organisations. The cricketers worked very hard, focussed on teamwork and their work ethic mimics our values. A fantastic three days.”

Bravery Trust provides financial assistance to current and former serving members and their families; since 2014, Bravery Trust has assisted more than 3500 Australian Veterans and their families.

Their Chief Executive Sean Farrell, who has connections with both organisations, was instrumental in coordinating this event. 

“Great example of showcasing Navy. Bravery Trust were delighted to help facilitate this week for Cricket Victoria. We put a request into the HMAS Cerberus Commanding Officer Tim Standen, which thankfully was approved. I know the cricketers have been impressed by the professionalism of the Navy sailors and the facilities they have enjoyed,” Sean Farrell said.

The activity culminated with the team undertaking the infamous ‘mud run’ on a cold and wet Cerberus morning.

Cricket player Glenn Maxwell said it was a great experience Navy’s teamwork.

“I thoroughly enjoyed the last few days. Being able to see what the recruits undertake and being able to do similar activities is a great insight into the Navy.  The mud run was good fun, it was bloody cold, that’s about the temperature of our ice baths back home and we’re only in them for a couple of minutes,” Glenn Maxwell said. 

“The way Navy is so determined and the importance of teamwork is very similar to the way we are tested in cricket. This has been very beneficial to our players.”

Commanding Officer HMAS Cerberus Captain Tim Standen, CSC RAN said “We enjoyed having Cricket Victoria here at HMAS Cerberus. Also the opportunity to continue our support to Bravery Trust’s hard work in helping our Service men and women in need, gives us great satisfaction.”