Sea Training Group embraces innovation and technology

This article has photo gallery Published on LEUT Gary McHugh (author), LSIS Bradley Darvill (author)

Location(s): Rockingham, Western Australia, Sydney, New South Wales

Topic(s): HMAS Watson, Fleet Base West, HMAS Newcastle (F06), HMAS Arunta (F151)

Sea Training Group's Warrant Officer Marcus Bent enters performance information into an electronic tablet during a damage control exercise onboard HMAS Arunta as part of Exercise STRONGBACK SIM.  (photo: LSIS Bradley Darvill)
Sea Training Group's Warrant Officer Marcus Bent enters performance information into an electronic tablet during a damage control exercise onboard HMAS Arunta as part of Exercise STRONGBACK SIM.

Pads and pens may soon be a thing of the past for Sea Training Group as Navy’s primary collective training provider embraces technology and innovation to ensure ships are ready for operational deployment.

As part of Exercise STRONGBACK SIM conducted during August concurrently on both sides of the continent, Sea Training Group trialled the use of specially developed software loaded onto electronic tablets to evaluate HMAS Arunta’s ship’s company, as part of that ship’s unit readiness training.

Commander Sea Training Commander Aaron Nye said the software, developed by Navy Information Management Systems, offered a number of benefits to the group, including the ability to quickly convert input from various trainers into a report that could be used to improve a ship’s response to a particular scenario.

“What the electronic tablets allow us to do is to gather the lessons learnt during events such as damage control exercises, quickly collate that information, and provide feedback to command and the ship’s company in a far more efficient manner than in the past,” he said.

Commander Nye said Sea Training Group itself has also evolved over the years in how it goes about its business of working-up fleet units, and as such has adopted a more innovative approach.

“The most important thing for us, as sea trainers, is that it’s a team effort,” he said.

“When we go onto a ship, our mutual desire is to ensure the ship does well, so we work with the ship’s company by providing coaching and mentoring to ensure the ship reaches its end state; which is unit-readiness over a five-week period.”

As well as forming part of Arunta’s training, Exercise STRONGBACK SIM also provided the opportunity for HMAS Newcastle to complete a number of air warfare competencies while alongside Fleet Base West.