Team makes rejoining easy

Published on LSIS Helen Frank (author), ABIS Chantell Bianchi (photographer)

Able Seaman Marine Technician, Stephen Timberlake checks the oil levels in the engine room onboard HMAS Gascoyne.  (photo: ABIS Chantell Bianchi)
Able Seaman Marine Technician, Stephen Timberlake checks the oil levels in the engine room onboard HMAS Gascoyne.

Navy’s Re-join Case Management Team (RCMT) is once again open for business and helping previous members to re-join the ranks.

The RCMT was established in July 2009 by then Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Crane, to assist ex-serving members who had moved into the Navy Reserves to re-join the permanent force, particularly those in categories that were short of personnel.

The small team, which is now integrated within the Navy People Career Management Agency (NPCMA), has helped more than 130 officers and sailors to re-enlist into the permanent naval force.

Lieutenant Commander Steve Spooner, the Officer-in-Charge of RCMT, said the team provided fast-tracking and individual case management to ex-serving reservists with critical skills, as they sought to re-join the Navy. However, based on designated skill degradation time-frames, the team is presently limited to processing members who have been out of the Navy for less than five years.

“While there are certain categories, and ranks within those categories, which the RCMT is particularly interested in, enquiries from any ex-member who has departed the Navy in the last few years is welcome,” he said.
 
The RCMT has significantly reduced the average time taken to return selected ex-members to permanent service.

Able Seaman Marine Technician, Stephen Timberlake in the engine room onboard HMAS Gascoyne.

Able Seaman Marine Technician, Stephen Timberlake in the engine room onboard HMAS Gascoyne.


 
“The team can facilitate an ex-member to re-join in as little as 25 days, in ideal circumstances,” Lieutenant Commander Spooner said.
 
Re-enlisting members benefits the Navy because ex-members have a history of service, a track record, and have an experiential understanding of what life in the Navy entails. As an element of NPCMA, RCMT is in a position to process re-entry applications with a degree of expediency that was not always achievable before the formation of the team.
 
Lieutenant Commander Spooner said there had also been significant financial benefits to the Navy.
 
“Between July 2009 and December 2010 the RCMT processed 87 re-entries, with their combined experience saving Navy more than $16m in training costs alone,” he said.
 
“Since the re-invigoration of the RCMT in mid-2012, the team has assisted more than 50 ex-members to return to Navy.”
 
One such member was Able Seaman Marine Technician Stephen Timberlake, of HMAS Gascoyne, who wanted to re-join after leaving the Navy in 2011.
 
“I left the Navy after completing my initial six years as I wanted to gain experience in the commercial sector,” Able Seaman Timberlake said.
 
“I did a bit of travel and worked as an air conditioning technician for a couple of years.”
 
“I decided to re-join for the job security and the good money,” he said.
 
Able Seaman Timberlake contacted RCMT on advice from a friend.
 
“RCMT made the process quite easy,” he said.
 
“They would call me when they had more information and made appointments for my medicals and that sort of thing.”
 
Originally an initiative of New Generation Navy, RCMT has now become an integral part of Navy Career Management’s everyday business.
 
The team is located within the Navy People Career Management Agency at Brindabella Park in Canberra.

Visit the RCMT page on the Navy website at http://www.navy.gov.au/rcmt for further information.