Confidence for HS BLUE Crew

Published on LEUT Kelli Lunt (author)

Topic(s): HMAS Leeuwin (A245), HS BLUE Crew

Lieutenant (LEUT) Reece Osborne pilots HMAS Leeuwin under the watchful eye of Navigation Officer, LEUT Scott Benstead (binoculars) and Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Commander Neil Cheverton. (photo: Unknown)
Lieutenant (LEUT) Reece Osborne pilots HMAS Leeuwin under the watchful eye of Navigation Officer, LEUT Scott Benstead (binoculars) and Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Commander Neil Cheverton.

Officers from the first Bridge Sim graduating class have found success on Hydrographic Ships (HS) since arriving at their first ship posting with Bridge Warfare Certificate (BWC) in hand.

LEUT Reece Osborne and SBLT Benjamin Stevenson are two of the four HS graduates of the first rotation who have both achieved their platform endorsement in HMAS Leeuwin, prior to commencing specialist courses.

LEUT Osborne said the initial training on the Bridge Simulator at HMAS Watson had been challenging but had been valuable in developing confidence on the Bridge.

“There was some concern initially as to our readiness having only completed the new Bridge Simulator system of training, but once given the chance we have been able to step up to show we are more than capable,” LEUT Osborne said.

“Hydrographic Ship platforms have a strong navigational focus, due to the nature of surveying operations in unsurveyed and confined waters. Accompanying an intensive warfare component conducted in the Bridge Sim has seen the four HS guys become well rounded Officers of the Watch (OOW) and will place us in good stead for our future career progression.

“Having made the mistakes in the simulator, I now feel confident in taking control of all our ship’s evolutions.”

Commanding Officer of HS BLUE Crew, currently embarked in Leeuwin, LCDR Neil Cheverton said the two OOW had become integral members of the HS BLUE crew.

“They have both got great bridge presence and confidence, something that normally needs to be built from scratch however with the new training regime they have that confidence which has been a real positive,” LCDR Cheverton said.

“Building the CO/OOW relationship is key - because they have the confidence of their own skill sets, they have been able to accelerate that, something that should not be undervalued.

“I am a great believer in the new training regime and it has taken significant pressure off the training burden of both the Nav and myself. We now 'refine' as opposed to ‘train’ and that is a real bonus.”

“Something that can never be bought or rushed is experience. During a recent transit through South East Asian waters to Singapore [they had to take] a Bridge Sim contact reporting policy and apply it in the South China Sea.

“[It] proved challenging at first but we doubled them up with experienced OOW's and it was great to see them rise to the challenge and learn a very real, practical application of their skills sets.”