Clearing the sea training backlog

Published on LEUT Kelli Lunt (author), ABIS Nicolas Gonzalez (photographer)

Topic(s): Training

Commander Individual Training (CIT), CMDR Marc Pavillard RAN, (right) discusses the current status of the training pipeline with the new incoming CIT Commander Andrew Fraser, RAN, at Fleet Headquarters in Sydney. (photo: ABIS Nicolas Gonzalez)
Commander Individual Training (CIT), CMDR Marc Pavillard RAN, (right) discusses the current status of the training pipeline with the new incoming CIT Commander Andrew Fraser, RAN, at Fleet Headquarters in Sydney.

The ‘sea training backlog’ has been reduced by 70 per cent since 2011 through the improved control of the training pipeline according to the figures in Training Force.

There are now less than 400 Officers and sailors waiting for initial sea training - this is down from 1350 people in January 2011 and approximately 950 at the beginning of last year. Training Force is expecting to have completely cleared the sea training backlog by August 2014.

Marine Technicians (MT) are one of the more challenging categories to move through the pipeline, but have still shown improvements, with the waiting list reduced from more than 350 in January 12 to less than 200. The figures for Electrical Technicians (ET) is less than 40, down from 170 in January 2011, with full recovery of the training pipeline expected before the end of the year.

Commodore Training, CDRE Mike Noonan, said Training Force had developed and implemented numerous strategies to assist in delivering trained people for Navy’s future force.

“In order for us to build the Navy of 2017, it is vital that we continue to improve our training throughput. Identifying training requirements and understanding the expected time frames for trainees to meet these requirements has led to increased credibility in the systems we’ve put in place,” CDRE Noonan said.

“We now have the right structure and processes in place, and although the results are very encouraging, all of us in Navy need to continue to be focused on maintaining the momentum of training our future replacements efficiently.”

Commander Individual Training, CMDR Marc Pavillard, who is responsible for overseeing improvements to trainee throughput, said the implementation of several initiatives has helped increase the size and efficiency of the training pipeline.

“We’ve worked hard with our partners, Directorate of Navy Category Management and Navy Personnel and Career Management Authority, to improve coordination and better control of the training pipeline. This is leading to significant improvement in trainee throughput,” CMDR Pavillard said.

“Success has also come from the progressive implementation and maturing of a number of initiatives imbedded in various reform activities, which were encapsulated in the Sea Training Campaign Plan. Key initiatives, which are now business as usual, include prioritised training positions at sea, rationalisation of the requirement for, and duration of, sea training for each category, and the establishment of the Competency Management Agency (CMA), supported by the Fleet Training Liaison Authority (FTLA) that optimises the ad-hoc and short term sea training opportunities that arise.

“All of these initiatives, have provided us with the capacity to catch up quickly. We are winning this battle,” CMDR Pavillard said.