Shoring relationships between Navies

Published on SBLT Andrew Murphy (author), Unknown (photographer)

Location(s): Port Hera, Timor-Leste

Topic(s): HMAS Launceston (P94), HMAS Broome (P90)

Members of HMA Ships Launceston and Broome instruct a group of young Timorese sailors in the basics of shoring and pipe repair, during their visit to the East Timorese Naval Establishment in Port Hera, Timor-Leste. (photo: Unknown)
Members of HMA Ships Launceston and Broome instruct a group of young Timorese sailors in the basics of shoring and pipe repair, during their visit to the East Timorese Naval Establishment in Port Hera, Timor-Leste.

Continuing its commitment to assisting regional naval forces in developing their capabilities, members of HMA Ships Launceston and Broome have paid a visit to the East Timorese Naval Establishment in Port Hera, Timor-Leste.

The crews instructed a group of young Timorese sailors in the basics of shoring and pipe repair for use in the event of a flood on board a vessel. Under the watchful eye of their class instructor, Lieutenant Gama, the Timorese sailors enthusiastically took to the task of learning the correct techniques for using RAN flood repair equipment, despite having never been exposed to damage control training before.

“The Timorese sailors in our brief training session displayed great ability and were extremely keen to learn,” said Petty Officer Marine Technician Daniel Jakobson

The RAN has provided the East Timorese Naval Component with a flood repair training module comparable to those used at the RAN School of Ship Safety and Survivability. It  has the ability to simulate conditions found on board a vessel experiencing a flood, such as cracked pipes, leaking hatches, and shrapnel holes in the bulkheads.

The Australian Government has signed an agreement with the government of Timor-Leste to provide two Guardian-class patrol boats to their naval forces so they may effectively patrol their maritime boundaries and assist in maintaining regional security. There is an ongoing commitment from the RAN to assist in developing a culture of maintenance, professionalism and seamanship amongst the sailors and naval officers of the East Timorese armed forces, and if this latest visit by the personnel of Launceston to Port Hera is a standard to go by, there is a great amount of potential amongst these men and women.

The East Timorese sailors themselves said that they look forward to the arrival of the new boats, and to learning much more from RAN personnel in the future.