Rare opportunity for third engineer

This article has photo gallery Published on SGT Dave Morley (author), ABCSO Steven Thomson (photographer), LSIS Jo Dilorenzo (photographer)

Leading Seaman Shaun Ware speaks with students during the Defence Force Recruiting Expo in Hobart, Tasmania. (photo: LSIS Jo Dilorenzo)
Leading Seaman Shaun Ware speaks with students during the Defence Force Recruiting Expo in Hobart, Tasmania.

Young Endeavour’s third engineer, Leading Seaman Marine Technician Shaun Ware, joined the Navy in 2003 and has since travelled the world.
 
He said his time in the ship had been a highlight of his career and he wouldn’t hesitate to do it again.
 

Leading Seaman Shaun Ware enjoys a climb up the foremast onboard Sail Training Ship Young Endeavour during the first leg of its world voyage.

Leading Seaman Shaun Ware enjoys a climb up the foremast onboard Sail Training Ship Young Endeavour during the first leg of its world voyage.

“I really enjoyed having the ability to ply my trade and take ownership of a vessel, which is difficult in a normal Navy setting,” Leading Seaman Ware said.
 
“They allowed me to develop and diversify my skill set and make the position my own.”
 
One of his more unusual tasks during the world voyage was filling the ship with more than a tonne of water from 10-litre water cooler bottles in Turkey, as the water there was not certified for drinking. 
 
“This evolution was quite inventive and definitely not something that would happen in normal day-to-day routine,” he said. 
 
“Another unusual task was snorkeling under the ship to check the propulsion system and hull throughout the world voyage.”
 
Leading Seaman Ware said it was difficult to pin down the highlights of the voyage.
 
“I would have to say rounding Cape Horn, the carnival in Rio, sailing up the Thames into St Katharine dock and attending a civic reception at Trinity House with royalty present were some of them,” he said. 
 
“Others included visiting Lowestoft, where the ship was built, and competing in the tall ship races in Norway, Denmark, Germany and the Netherlands, and then rounding the Cape of Good Hope. 
 
“Being from a military family, attending Anzac Cove on the 100th anniversary of the ANZAC landings was a once-in-a-lifetime experience.”
 
Leading Seaman Ware particularly enjoyed seeing the transformation of the youth crew during the different stages of the voyage from fresh-faced on day one to experienced sailors by their last port-of-call.
 
“The seamanship, leadership and team-building skill they mastered will stay with them for life, whether it is on a sailing platform or in a boardroom,” he said.