Inaugural Science Strategy

Published on Department of Defence (author)

Location(s): Canberra, Australian Capital Territory

RADM Jonathan Mead and Dr David Kershaw at the signing of the inaugural Defence Maritime Science and Technology Strategy. (photo: Unknown)
RADM Jonathan Mead and Dr David Kershaw at the signing of the inaugural Defence Maritime Science and Technology Strategy.

The inaugural Defence Maritime Science and Technology Strategy was signed in Canberra on 22 March.
 
Head Navy Capability Rear Admiral Jonathan Mead said the strategy was co-developed by Navy, Air Force, Capability Acquisition Sustainment Group, and Defence Science and Technology Group.

“It is symbolic of the One Defence approach, where we are moving to a partnership between the Services and Groups,” Rear Admiral Mead said. 
“We are all in this together.”
 
The strategy document was co-signed by Rear Admiral Mead and Acting Domain Program Manager Maritime, Defence Science and Technology Group, David Kershaw.

Entitled Shaping Defence Science and Technology in the Maritime Domain: 2016-2026, the new strategy outlines future areas of focus for Defence capability and objectives, and identifies which areas of science and technology have the potential to support their development.
 
The strategy considers existing strategic guidance, changes in the maritime operational environment and current maritime science and technology support to Defence, and aims to inform and shape future science and technology capabilities.
 
The five primary focus areas for science and technology support identified, that cover the breadth of support required for the maritime domain, are:

  • decision superiority;
  • mission survivability in a high-threat environment;
  • joint and combined operations;
  • creating and shaping the future force; and
  • seaworthy and airworthy fleet.

The strategy notes that, while the five focus areas require enduring support, they encompass a number of specific priority areas that address current and future maritime challenges.
 
The strategy identifies the following priority areas as intended to inform and shape science and technology capabilities:

  • information integration and interoperability;
  • robust and protected networks and infrastructure;
  • task group operations;
  • theatre anti-submarine warfare;
  • integrated air and missile defence;
  • enhanced current capability.