Valuing tradition leads to submarine career

Published on POIS Phil Cullinan (author), LSIS Nina Fogliani (photographer)

Location(s): HMAS Cerberus

Topic(s): Training, HMAS Cerberus, Centenary of Anzac, Ships, Boats and Submarines, Submarines (SSG), Anzac Day, Training Authority Submarines, HMAS Perth (I), 75th Anniversary

Recruit Timothy Herring with a picture of his grand father who served on HMAS Perth I and was a prisoner of war during World War II on the great Burma Railway. (photo: LSIS Nina Fogliani)
Recruit Timothy Herring with a picture of his grand father who served on HMAS Perth I and was a prisoner of war during World War II on the great Burma Railway.

This Anzac Day has particular meaning for a recruit at HMAS Cerberus, as it is his first in uniform, and the start of his chapter in a family tradition.

Recruit Timothy Herring enlisted into the Royal Australian Navy five weeks ago as an Electronics Technician Submariner to fulfil a passion that he has had for a long time.
 
Born and raised in the Blue Mountains he left school at the age of 16 to get a trade, and now more than ten years later, realised it was not what he wanted to continue doing. 
 
The call of the sea finally gave way, with a Grandfather who had service in the Royal Australian Navy helping with the decision. 
 
"Having family that has previously served in the Navy, it was a very easy decision to make," he said
 
Having the full support of his wife Kami and his children Hayley and Blake 13, Timothy 9 and Malachi 6, he signed up and was accepted by the Navy.

His grandfather served in the Second World War and was on HMAS Perth when it sunk and was a prisoner of war from three and a half years working on the Burma railway.
 
"Apparently, my Grandad didn’t talk much about his time on the Burma railway; My dad had a few stories he told me but other than it was very vague," he said.
 
"He had died before I was born, but the thought that I am now at Cerberus where he was all those years ago is quite moving for me."

Five weeks in, Recruit Herring has enjoyed meeting new people and becoming part of the Navy team.
 
"Recruit School is hard because you are always on the go, and when I get down time, I call my family.

"There are so many stories of what has been happening, it all seems a world away at the moment," he said
 
Recruit Herring is looking forward to earning the sought-after dolphins and giving his children a chance to consider making their own chapters in this military story.